<em>Guest Post by DIMITRI SIMES</em>: What Exactly Did Saakashvili Think Would Happen?

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Dimitri Simes TWN.jpg
This is a guest post by Nixon Center President Dimitri K. Simes that was written for joint publication at The Washington Note and National Interest.
It is remarkable, but probably inevitable, that so many in Washington have reacted with surprise and outrage to Russia’s response to President Mikheil Saakashvili’s attempt to reestablish Georgian control over South Ossetia by force.
Some of the angriest statements come from those inside and outside the Bush administration who contributed, I assume unwittingly, to making this crisis happen. And like post-WMD justifications for the invasion of Iraq, the people demanding the toughest action against Russia are focused on Russia’s lack of democracy and heavy-handed conduct, particularly in its own neighborhood, and away from how the confrontation actually unfolded. Likewise, just as in the case of Saddam Hussein, these same people accuse anyone who points out that things are not exactly black and white, and that the U.S. government may have its own share of responsibility for the crisis, of siding with aggressive tyrants – in this case, in the Kremlin.
Yet many both outside and even inside the Bush administration predicted that the U.S. decision to champion Kosovo independence without Serbian consent would lead Moscow to become more assertive in establishing its presence in Abkhazia and South Ossetia.
The Kremlin made abundantly clear that it would view Kosovo’s independence without Serbian consent and a U.N. Security Council mandate as a precedent for the two Georgian de facto independent enclaves. Furthermore, while President Saakashvili was making obvious his ambition to reconquer Abkhazia and South Ossetia, Moscow was both publicly and privately warning that Georgia’s use of force to reestablish control of the two regions would meet a tough Russian reaction, including, if needed, air strikes against Georgia proper.
So it would be interesting to know what President Saakashvili was thinking when, on Thursday night, after days of relatively low-level shelling around the South Ossetian capital of Tskhinvali (which both South Ossetians and Georgians blamed on each other), and literally hours after he announced on state-controlled TV the cessation of hostilities, he ordered a full-scale assault on Tskhinvali. And mind you, the assault could only succeed if the Georgian units went right through the battalion of Russian troops serving as international peacekeepers according to agreements signed by Tbilisi itself in the 1990s.
Under the circumstances, the Russian forces had three choices: to surrender, to run away, or to fight. And fight they did – particularly because many of the Russian soldiers were in fact South Ossetians with families and friends in Tskhinvali under Georgian air, tank, and artillery attacks. Saakashvili was reckless to count on proceeding with a blitzkrieg in South Ossetia without a Russian counterattack.
Now the Bush administration and outside commentators are appalled by Russia’s disproportionate response. But proportionality is in the eye of the beholder. In July 2006, after Hezbollah captured two Israeli soldiers and killed three others–smaller losses than those inflicted on the Russian troops in Tskhinvali–the Israelis launched a massive bombardment of Lebanon, including Beirut, killing more than a thousand Lebanese, many of them civilians.
When some in the U.N. Security Council sought to condemn Israel’s “disproportionate response,” the United States acted as Israel’s staunchest defender and prevented any resolution critical of Israel.
Notwithstanding this background, the United States has no good choices in dealing with the crisis. There is no realistic way to remove Russian forces from Abkhazia and South Ossetia short of a major war with Russia, which no responsible American political leader would advocate at this point. But whatever Saakashvili’s responsibility is for the confrontation, America cannot allow an ally to be soundly defeated or especially overthrown by an insurgent Russia.
Accordingly, the first priority for the United States should be to make abundantly clear to Moscow that any attempt at forceful regime change in Georgia will have severe consequences for the U.S.-Russian relationship and that the United States would help Georgia to resist on the ground.
Though the U.S. will not send troops–and Moscow knows it–we can provide significant military assistance to Tbilisi and greatly complicate a Russian military advance. Bringing Georgian troops back to their country from Iraq is one step on this path.
While the Georgian army is no match for the much larger Russian forces, it is potent after years of double-digit budget increases and American equipment and training. Also, unlike in Abkhazia and South Ossetia, where most of the population is friendly to the Russians, any Russian attempts to occupy Georgia would likely encounter massive popular resistance.
Moscow disavows any plan to conquer Georgia, and the Bush administration should hold them to their word, both through diplomacy to the extent possible, and a display of resolve if necessary. When this has been accomplished, however, we should look for ways to work with Russia in the name of essential American interests. We should also disregard the hysterical diatribes of Saakashvili’s American champions, who protest too much–perhaps because their irresponsible encouragement of the Georgian president was a contributing factor on the road to the war.
– Dimitri K. Simes

Comments

26 comments on “<em>Guest Post by DIMITRI SIMES</em>: What Exactly Did Saakashvili Think Would Happen?

  1. Phil says:

    Russia did what was necessary in it’s own back yard. It matters
    not what side of the fence you sit with this situation. The USA
    has done much more to harm it’s own reputation and interests
    these past few years. [Lets not get into the ethics of destroying a
    sovereign state over lies and deception now.]
    On using the 2014 Winter Olympics as a carrot or stick – Please
    save us the from the ridiculous! Europe needs that Russian
    energy more than the Russians need the Olympics.
    Citizens of the USA, concern yourselves with your own affairs
    and your own neighborhood. Leave the rest of the world to get
    on with it’s own affairs too.
    Putin has no desire to have Tbilisi on his map. either. He just
    wants a better behaved neighbor. And what is good for Kosovo
    is good for S.Osettia and Abakhazia too.
    Well done Mt Putin! Keep up the good work

    Reply

  2. john says:

    What must be remembered is that Russia held off for 16 hours before invading Georgia. Meanwhile Georgia destroyed three hospitals, and killed hundreds of civilians. They targeted civilians, ran over some with tanks, burned at least one house and one church full of people, in short were nothing less than animals. Unfortunately some of their American and Israeli advisors managed to get killed and or captured also. I say they got what they asked for.

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  3. brian says:

    FYI:
    ‘Russian Cameraman: CNN Aired Misleading Footage
    Paul Joseph Watson
    Prison Planet
    Tuesday, August 12, 2008
    CNN is airing misleading footage of the war between Georgia and Russia, skewing public opinion in favor of the Georgians, according to a Russia Today cameraman interviewed this morning.
    The Russia Today satellite TV company aired the interview on its English language news channel but the story is yet to appear on the Internet or in any other news outlet.
    UPDATE: Russia Today has now posted the following on their website and uploaded a video.
    The Russian cameraman charged that CNN had used his footage of Georgian forces attacking Russian civilians in Tskhinvali, the provincial capital of South Ossetia, but then claimed it showed Russians attacking Georgians in the Georgian town of Gori.
    The Georgian assault on Tskhinvali, described as an act of genocide and a war crime by Russian officials and other eyewitnesses, led to the slaughter of at least 2,000 civilians. The fact that Georgia, backed by the U.S. and Israel, were responsible for the provocation that led to the Russian response, has been buried by the majority of western corporate media.
    Western media bias to skew popular opinion in favor of the U.S. and NATO client state Georgia was evident from the very start of the conflict.
    etc
    http://www.infowars.com/?p=3904

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  4. James Smith says:

    It doesn’t look to me that either the modernized Georgia armed forces or the Georgian civilians were very interested in standing up to the resurgent Russian army. This wasn’t Yeltsin’s cowardly Russia, but Putin’s Russia. The USA’s Georgian puppets got what was coming to them.

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  5. arthurdecco says:

    I have to ask again, “Cui bono?”
    Who benefits financially from the deliberate distortions and outright lies being promulgated in the Western media about that mythical, “democratic” Georgia and its very real, extremely stupid, stupid, political leadership and the phantasmagoric character, evil Darth Putin and the Death Star State of Russia that he commands?
    Because someone has to be benefiting big time – why else would our media whores and politikal klass be lying so brazenly in the face of so much readily available, contradictory evidence?
    Who is it that is getting rich riding the bleeding, flailed backs of the innocent to Armageddon this time?
    Of course, I realize Israel and the US hope to benefit politically but that doesn’t answer my question – who, EXACTLY, (names, dates and serial numbers) are the scum bags that are benefiting from these manipulations in the Caucasians?
    Can anyone tell me?

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  6. Junious Ricardo Stanton says:

    Saakashvili was no doubt encouraged by Washington (just as Washington tacitly encouraged Saddam Hussein to invade Kuwait then turned on him for doing it) to initiate hostilities against South Ossetia. Russia’s heavy handed response to Georgia’s attack was meant to send a clear message to NATO,the US and Israel.Putin is letting them know in no uncertain terms, Russia will not tolerate a Kosovo type situation or the planned US/NATO missile shield in their backyard. Putin is also signaling he will not sit passively by and allow Israeli or US intrigue to spread on Russia’s borders. It should also be viewed as a hint of how Russia will respond if Israel or the US attack Iran.
    The crazies in Washington should take notice and rethink their plans via a vis Iran. It is the height of hypocrisy for Bu$h or their corporate media sock puppets to criticize Russia in this situation. What about the US’s “Shock and Awe” on Baghdad, their heavy handed assault on Fallujah or the seven years of carnage still going on in Afghanistan? All of which were based upon Bu$h’s lies.

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  7. Paul Norheim says:

    Yeah, and this from Wikipedia on Z.B. (especially the last
    paragraph!):
    “In 1998, Brzezinski was interviewed by the French newspaper
    Nouvel Observateur on the topic of Afghanistan. He revealed
    that CIA support for the mujaheddin had started before the
    1979 Soviet invasion, knowingly increasing the probability of a
    Soviet invasion. Brzezinski saw the invasion as an opportunity to
    embroil the Soviet Union in a bloody conflict comparable to
    America’s experience in Vietnam. He referred to this as the
    “Afghan Trap” and viewed the end of the Soviet empire as worth
    the cost of strengthening militant Islamic groups. [19][20]
    In his 1997 book The Grand Chessboard, Brzezinski says that
    assistance to the Afghan resistance was a tactic designed to bog
    down the Soviet army while the United States built up a
    deterrent military force in the Persian Gulf to prevent Soviet
    political or military penetration farther south.”

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  8. brian says:

    Perhaps people recall this :
    ‘Question: Despite this risk, you were an advocate of this covert action. But perhaps you yourself desired this Soviet entry into war and looked to provoke it?
    Brzezinski: It isn’t quite that. We didn’t push the Russians to intervene, but we knowingly increased the probability that they would.
    Question: When the Soviets justified their intervention by asserting that they intended to fight against secret involvement of the United States in Afghanistan, people didn’t believe them. However, there was a basis of truth. You don’t regret anything today?
    Brzezinski: Regret what? That secret operation was an excellent idea. It had the effect of drawing the Russians into the Afghan trap and you want me to regret it? The day that the Soviets officially crossed the border, I wrote to President Carter, in substance: We now have the opportunity of giving to the USSR its Vietnam war. Indeed, for almost 10 years, Moscow had to carry on a war unsupportable by the government, a conflict that brought about the demoralization and finally the breakup of the Soviet empire.
    etc
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article7323.htm
    Brzenski is not outraged at Russia:
    Brzezinski: Russia’s Invasion of Georgia Is Reminiscent of Stalin’s Attack on Finland:
    By Nathan Gardels:
    Fundamentally at stake is what kind of role Russia will play in the new international system. Unfortunately, Putin is putting Russia on a course that is ominously similar to Stalin’s and Hitler’s in the late 1930s. Swedish foreign minister Carl Bildt has correctly drawn an analogy between Putin’s “justification” for dismembering Georgia — because of the Russians in South Ossetia — to Hitler’s tactics vis a vis Czechoslovakia to “free” the Sudeten Deutsch.
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article20496.htm

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  9. brian says:

    Israel and US behind the Georgian military action in South Ossetia:
    ‘While Israel was keen to downplay its role, Georgia perhaps hoped that flattery might draw Israel further in. Georgian minister Temur Yakobashvili — whom the Israeli daily Haaretz stressed was Jewish — told Israeli army radio that “Israel should be proud of its military which trained Georgian soldiers.” Yakobashvili claimed rather implausibly, according to Haaretz, that “a small group of Georgian soldiers were able to wipe out an entire Russian military division, thanks to the Israeli training” (“Georgian minister tells Israel Radio: Thanks to Israeli training, we’re fending off Russian military,” Haaretz, 11 August 2008).
    Since 2000, Israel has sold hundreds of millions of dollars in arms and combat training to Georgia. Weapons included guns, ammunition, shells, tactical missile systems, antiaircraft systems, automatic turrets for armored vehicles, electronic equipment and remotely piloted aircraft. These sales were authorized by the Israeli defense ministry (Arie Egozi, “War in Georgia: The Israeli connection,” Ynet, 10 August 2008).’
    http://electronicintifada.net/v2/article9756.shtml
    and
    ‘NATO instructor taken hostage with Georgians amid reports of U.S. military commanding thousands of mercs in proxy war
    Paul Joseph Watson
    [1] Prison Planet
    Monday, August 11, 2008
    An American mercenary has been captured by Russian forces along with a number of Georgian soldiers according to a report from the Russian news website Izvestia, providing more evidence that the U.S. and NATO are covertly supporting the Georgian army in a proxy war with Russia.
    [2] According to the report, the mercenary is an African-American who is a NATO instructor and an ordinance specialist. He has now been transferred to the Russian base of Vladikavkaz.’
    Etc
    http://www.prisonplanet.com/american-mercenary-captured-by-russians.html
    History is repeating itself: US.israel wants to draw Russia into a war, which will both weaken it and justify US/NATO intervention, while it prepares for war with Iran.

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  10. Dr Alok Bhattacharyya says:

    (Sorry to send the comment again. Corrected some spelling mistakes. Moderator please remove my previous two comments. It’s embarassing!)
    The USA and Georgia were playing war games in Georgia that ended only on 31 July and on 8 August Saakashvili decides to liberate SO. Did all the American and Israeli military officers leave before this fiasco began or were they involved too?
    Medvedev has announced that Russia will proceed with criminal proceedings against the perpetrators of genocide of Russians in SO and they are collecting evidence including forensic ones. US government should be very cautious in denouncing Russia now for disproportionate response. Whole world knows about US response after 9/11 and many will be only too happy to see leaders US, Israel and UK in The Hague for genocide and war crimes and found guilty.
    It looks like Georgia through Saakashvili was used as a pawn in the Grand Chessboard a la Brzezinski to test Russian reaction if its interests are harmed as is expected to happen if Iran is attacked. One only hopes that the players who advanced this particular pawn received the message loud and clear.

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  11. Dr Alok Bhattacharyya says:

    (Sorry to send the comment again. Corrected some spelling mistaks.)
    The USA and Georgia were playing war games in Georgia that ended only on 31 July and on 8 August Saakashvili decides to liberate SO. Did all the American and Israeli military officers leave before this fiasco began or were they involved too?
    Medvedev has announced that Russia will proceed with criminal proceedings against the perpetrators of genocide of Russians in SO and they are collecting evidence including forensic ones. US government should be very cautious in denouncing Russia now for disproportionate response. Whole world knows about US response after 9/11 and many will be only too happy to see leaders US, Israel and UK in The Hague for genocide and war crimes and found guilty.
    It looks like Georgia through Saakashvili was used as a pawn in the Grand Chessboard a la Brzezinski to test Russian reaction if its interests are harmed as is expected to happen if Iran is attacked. One only hopes that the players who advanced this particular pawn received the message loud and clear.

    Reply

  12. Dr Alok Bhattacharyya says:

    The USA and Georgia were playing war games in Georgia that ended only on 31 July and on 8 August Saakashvili decides to liberate SO. Did all the American and Israeli military officers leave before this fiasco began or were they involved too?
    Medvedev has announced that Russia will proceed with criminal procedings against the perpirators of genocide of Russians in SO and they are collecting evidence including forensic ones. US government should be very cautious in denouncing Russia now for disproportionate response. Whole world knows about US response after 9/11 and many will be only too happy to see leaders US, Israel and UK in the Hague for genocide and war crimes and found gulty.
    It looks like Georgia through Saakashvili was used as a pawn in the Grand Chessboard a la Brezinski to test Russian reaction if its interests are harmed as is expeced to happen if Iran is attacked. One only hopes that the players who advanced this particular pawn received the message loud and clear.

    Reply

  13. corinne says:

    “Under the circumstances, the Russian forces had three choices: to surrender, to run away, or to fight.”
    Under the circumstances, they had to fight–to preserve the Kremlin’s energy monopoly in Europe.
    http://www.robertamsterdam.com/2008/08/the_pipeline_war.htm

    Reply

  14. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Scheunemann was also one of the brilliant strategists that bought Chalabi’s line of crap. Considering Scheunemann’s stellar past performance, its easy to see why McCain picked him. In Bushworld, such ineptitude must be rewarded, and epic failure is a “must have” on your resume. Of course, a felony or two on your arrest record helps to. Sadly, Scheunemann lacks that qualification, but no doubt, as a member of a GOP Presidential candidate’s staff, there will be plenty of opportunity to rectify that shortcoming.

    Reply

  15. Charles F says:

    “America cannot allow an ally to be soundly defeated…”
    Whoops, a bit late for that now.

    Reply

  16. rich says:

    John McCain’s lobbyist-advisor apparently works for Georgia, lobbying for NATO membership—and for US corporations seeking oil contracts in Georgia.
    Hmm. Wonder how that influences McCain’s policy positions?
    http://thinkprogress.org/2008/08/08/scheunemann-mccain-georgia/
    >>
    Scheunemann Helped U.S. Firm Win Georgian Energy Deals While Lobbying For Georgia’s NATO Membership
    [McCain's] top foreign policy adviser — Randy Scheunemann — has spent a number of years lobbying on behalf of Georgia and has publicly taken strong pro-Georgia, anti-Russia positions.
    Last May, USA Today reported that Scheunemann’s lobbying firm, Orion Strategies, represented Georgia between 2003 and March 2008 and that Scheunemann himself lobbied McCain’s Senate staff on behalf of Georgia while working for McCain’s presidential campaign.
    Also, freelance journalist Lindsay Beyerstein reported last month that Scheunemann serves as Worldwide Strategic Energy’s (WSE) point man on Georgia, helping the energy firm score deals with the Georgian government to assist in the development of its “hydrocarbon industry.” From a WSE internal document obtained by Beyerstein:
    ‘Randy Scheunemann is a registered representative of the Government of Georgia in the United States. Accordingly, Mr. Scheunemann has developed a very close relationship with President of Georgia Mikheil Saakashvili and many senior Georgian officials. The WSE team has also begun negotiating possible deals with the Georgian state-run oil company, National Oil Company of Georgia, to assist in the development of Georgia’s hydrocarbon industry.’
    So what then does Scheunemann do on Georgia’s behalf? He tries to get U.S. politicians on-board with Georgia’s full membership into NATO. In fact, he has had success with at least one Member of Congress, Sen. John McCain:
    ‘In 2005, Mr. Scheunemann asked Sen. McCain to introduce a Senate resolution expressing support for peace in the Russia-influenced region of South Ossetia that wants to break away from Georgia, the records show. […] The Senate approved Sen. McCain’s resolution in December 2005.’
    Sen. McCain has endorsed Georgia’s goal of entering NATO, a matter for which the country hired Mr. Scheunemann to lobby. In 2006, Sen. McCain gave a speech at the Munich Conference on Security in Germany in which he said Georgia should enter NATO.
    According to Beyerstein, WSE’s internal document “was circulated to prospective investors in 2007,” and as USA Today noted, Scheunemann did not stop lobbying on behalf of Georgia until March 2008, but “he remains a principal at his lobbying firm, which still has Georgia as a client.” In fact, Scheunemann “had a phone conversation in November [2007] about Georgia with Richard Fontaine, an aide in McCain’s Senate office.”
    <<

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  17. Chris Johnson says:

    Ever since this story first broke, and the mass media began
    barreling ahead with its usual blend of ‘exclusive footage’ and
    single-focus narration, something’s been bothering me about the
    situation, and after reading this article by Dimitri I know what it
    was. As a footnote, I should point out that I’m British, and while in
    a lot of situations I would point out the nature of US news services
    being over-reactionary and only interested in the politics of fear,
    the UK news has been much the same with the situation in
    Georgia. The news on all the major networks in my country
    compares just the same with the coverage I see from CNN, NBC and
    Fox.
    I can only hope the sensible word gets out, and we get the news we
    need, and not deserve.

    Reply

  18. texas dem says:

    I assume, given the Kosovo precedent and the fact that Georgia both started and lost this war, that Saak has lost both Ossetia and Abkhazia for good now? That will surely be the outline of the eventual cease-fire, no? Russia pulls out of Georgia, in exchange for a process whose duration I can’t predict, but that will end in the absorption of both into Russia?
    I mean, an “independent” South Ossetia is laughable. It’s not going back to Georgia anymore, and the idea of it as a country is just silly. Kosovo was pushing the lower limit, and it’s three times larger in area and thirty times larger in population, and in a neighborhood already populated with microstates. South Ossetia has (had) 70,000 people… my city council district has more than that!
    Not to mention that the larger half of Ossetia is already in Russia, along with all the refugees from South Ossetia.
    So, what do we get? An actual transfer of territory from Georgia to Russia? That’s pretty humiliating for the US, and would get Saak tarred and feathered. A return to status-quo-ante, but with a formal security guarantee from Russia to the “Russian citizens” in Ossetia, backed up by an enormous “peacekeeping” Russian contingent (and thus a territory transfer in all but name)?
    The end game here is going to suck for Georgia. And these are the best case scenarios. Another country ruined by trusting Dick Cheney.
    Although if the Russians are too aggressive and maximalist here, the Georgians may get a NATO paper in the future after all. Or is that foolishness on my part?

    Reply

  19. Tim says:

    Russia supposedly has the 2014 Winter Olympics. What
    prevents the international community from using that as a carrot
    and a stick to keep Russia from invading Georgia? Take away
    that Olympics if they invade. Keep the honor if Russia backs off.

    Reply

  20. JamesL says:

    Great post! What a contrast to major media.
    Ah yes. The precedent has been set. Bush set it. Literally millions of people demonstrated, trying to reach George, saying this is a bad, bad idea. There will be repercussions. George didn’t listen. George doesn’t care what people think. He’s the man! He helped decide about torture too, about continual misinformation, about more secrecy so he could do whatever he wanted, about giving himself ever more power. The repercussions are here now. George has wasted America’s most relevant weapons–goodwill, honesty, diplomacy, humans rights ideals–and has only the military kind left. It is just impossible to imagine how much he has screwed up.

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  21. linda says:

    All the foreign policy experts seem to be like blind men and women describing an elephant. And that’s very sad because innocent people are dying in Georgia and American citizens are going to pay one way or another for the foreign policy and military mistakes of this administration for many decades.

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  22. arthurdecco says:

    Zathras said: “The precedent Russia is setting now…”
    Surely you jest! The precedent RUSSIA is setting now?!?
    Does America educate its citizens? Or just program them?

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  23. Carroll says:

    Posted by DonS Aug 11, 9:26PM
    Since I am mostly in agreement with Steve on this I am happy to report that Steve and the TWN views are being very “widely quoted”….
    Earlier I read the UAE’s The National, which quoted Steve and btw has a good overview on this fight.
    If anyone wants the link I will have to find it again.

    Reply

  24. Zathras says:

    Both Simes’ assessment of Georgian president Saakashvili’s imprudence and his prescription as to American policy toward the Georgian crisis seem on target to me.
    Having noted earlier what I regard as the strong possibility that Russia has long sought a plausible pretext to do what it is doing now, it is no more than fair for me to note also that no government in Georgia’s exposed position should ever be encouraged to risk a military confrontation it cannot win. The Bush administration has (correctly) made very clear to a government with far stronger ties to us than Georgia’s has — the one on Taiwan — that we could not support it if it did one thing it badly wanted to do. If no similar warning was made to Tbilisi, it would constitute a serious error on the part of the administration.
    With that said, over the long term it is Russia, not Georgia, that is our problem here. There are any number of governments in the region, stretching north to the Baltic states, with ethnic Russian minorities on whose behalf Vladimir Putin might decide Russian armor must be deployed. The precedent Russia is setting now does not make that prospect less likely, and the precedent set if Russian forces attempt to overthrow Georgia’s government would be even worse.

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  25. DonS says:

    Posturing, as we know, is so so easy. It doesn’t cost anything in the present and, when in conformity with supportive or confused but malleable recipients, has little consequence for the posturer. So far, the Russians are painted as the bad guys in the media. What red-blooded American is going to argue with that? Its fairly a no-brainer for the average American. (even after the lies and debacle of Iraq!!)
    It is ironic that, while those who rail against Russia for acting in a cold war manner in this benighted post-cold war world, are actually harking back to a very cold war manner of posturing. While denouncing Russia’s supposed cold war “aggression”, the best they can do is fall back on cold war animosities and tendencies, epitomized by McCain’s brash hawking counter-aggression. Total hubris.
    So, given the easy “they bad-we (US and Georgia) good” blabbering, let’s see who in the MSM can mount a semi-coherent analysis of the situation that mirrors the more real understanding exemplified here.
    Kudos for TWN for trying to inform the discussion. Who’s listening?

    Reply

  26. syvaen says:

    Another very sensible reaction to the Georgian crises. You ask: what were those people thinking when we recognized Kosovo over Russia’s warnings. Perhaps this is what they were thinking. Elements in the military/industrial complex need enemies to justify the American war machine. Sooner or later the American people will begin to realize that Iraq and Iran are not really threats. Look at it as a investment for the future, a way to stir up the people to start hating Russia again.
    Or is this attributing cognitive direction to the military/industrial complex not yet realized?

    Reply

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