Jeb Bush: Silky Sullivan Surprise in 2012?

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jeb_bush.jpgI don’t care what he says and don’t care what the analysts think, my hunch is that Jeb Bush may be lurking way behind in the shadows preparing to run in 2012 — and that could be a very tough race for President Obama. And even if he doesn’t then, he’s only 63 in 2016.
Jeb Bush is going out of his way to squash rumors that he might run. He told the New York Times‘ John Harwood he was definitely not running in 2012.
But what if there just isn’t anyone serious out there who can bridge the ascendant Tea Party movement with the GOP establishment? My bet is that the more Jeb Bush says “NO”, the more the party will eventually demand that he be the candidate — and my bet (as things look today) is that Sarah Palin will be the kingmaker in the decision.
I spoke with a very wealthy, somewhat secretive GOP donor in the Hamptons in the late summer who told me that those who prefer Jeb Bush in 2012 want him to wait in the background until the reality sets in that the GOP has no candidate. Then, like Silky Sullivan, Bush will come out of the closet as the only candidate that the Tea Party and gray hairs of the party can coalesce around.

Taegan Goddard posted a link to a CNN survey of Republicans which asked them as they left voting polls on Tuesday who they’d like to have as their GOP presidential candidate in 2012.
The results:

Iowa: Romney 21%, Huckabee 21%, Palin 18%, Gingrich 7%
New Hampshire: Romney 39%, Palin 18%, Huckabee 11%, Gingrich 9%
South Carolina: Palin 25%, Huckabee 24%, Romney 21%, Gingrich 20%
In match ups against President Obama, Huckabee leads 52% to 44% and Romney is ahead 50% to 45%. However, Obama beats Gingrich 49% to 47% and tops Palin 52% to 44%.

Other candidates mentioned but all of whom were in single digits were Ron Paul, Haley Barbour, Tim Pawlenty, Mike Pence, and Rick Santorum.
I don’t think any of these candidates, including Romney and Palin, can bridge the differences inside the GOP.
Bush wasn’t included on the list. Neither for that matter was Mitch Daniels, who I think would make an attractive candidate on many levels — but again is probably not someone the Tea Party crowd would go for.
Despite rumors that he has some serious family issues that might complicate a run, I think Jeb Bush would be the GOP’s best shot at dislodging President Obama.
And if Bush does take the lead on the ticket, the question is then whether Obama will shuffle his own team and consider Hillary Clinton. Lots of stuff would have to happen for that to take place — but it’s in the realm of possibility even though President Obama is rumored to have already told Joe Biden that he wants him on the ticket in 2012.
This all could be wrong — but I’m still suspicious that Jeb Bush has been studying up on Silky Sullivan. Obama should too.
– Steve Clemons

Comments

44 comments on “Jeb Bush: Silky Sullivan Surprise in 2012?

  1. Don Bacon says:

    It has come to my attention that while there are about the same number of registered motor vehicles in the USA as people, a relatively small portion of these vehicles are under warranty. How can motorists with maxed-out credit cards be expected to pay for major car repairs?
    So I propose a mandatory car care bill which would mandate the purchase of vehicle maintenance insurance. This mandate is consitutional because cars are used in interstate commerce, which the Congress has a right to regulate. This new law would allow the people with newer cars to help cover the maintenance costs of clunkers.
    Oh, there are a lot of dogs and cats in this country too — they’re next.

    Reply

  2. nadine says:

    “The health care bill was unpopular because it was seen as a hollow sham, just another bailout of the health-industrial complex, not because it was it was viewed as an unconstitutional intrusion in the personal lives of the citizens. ” (Dakota)
    No, Dakota, that’s just how how the liberals saw the health bill. The other 80% of the country saw something different.
    As far as the 60% who want it repealed are concerned, you’re not giving the healthcare bill enough credit: it may look like it gives riches to the healthcare industry, but the rules and regulations it is imposing are actually designed to drive the industry out of business altogether and force the creation of a single payer system.
    To put it another way: Robert Gibbs has a point when he complains the “professional left” doesn’t appreciate what Obama has done.

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  3. questions says:

    More great analysis from Jonathan Bernstein!
    http://plainblogaboutpolitics.blogspot.com/2010/11/no-it-wasnt-unified-government.html
    “Yes, it’s true that people will tell pollsters that they like divided government. They’ll also tell pollsters that they don’t like either party, that they are independent voters, and that they vote the candidate, not the party.
    All bunk. Most voters are either hard or soft partisans, as John Sides will tell you. (By the way, easy short cut? On the surface, the electorate is about one third Republicans, one third Democrats, one third independents. Ask the right way, and you find out that of those independents one third are basically Republicans, one third Democrats, and one third real-life true independents. So one third of one third, or about 10%, are real independents). ”
    And there’s more…..
    http://plainblogaboutpolitics.blogspot.com/2010/11/mr-smith-fantasies-from-mr-rich.html
    This one takes on Frank Rich, the fact that the real government isn’t “The West Wing,” and ends with a hat tip to Matthew Yglesias for a great read of the successes and failures of HCR as read through the economy…..
    Perspective, ahhhh.

    Reply

  4. Kathleen Grasso Andersen says:

    No surprise to me…I’ve been saying for years that Repigs will let Sarah Palin scare the Beegeeezus out of everyone and then they’ll pull Jeb out of the the hat and he’ll actually look good in comparison. With the Supreme Court ruling allowing anonymouscorporate contributions of any size, issues are no longer a factor…sound bytes and Pavlavian repetItion of some scarey, paranoid Islamofascist mantras is all it will take to herd the sheeple. The only reason they need us to vote is to lend their nonsensical farce legitimacy.

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  5. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Here’s Biden sucking the Israeli’s off……
    http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/biden-to-american-jewry-u-s-determined-to-stop-iran-from-obtaining-nuclear-weapons-1.323521
    I guess he figures “the right to defend itself” includes executing an American citizen while he’s lying prone on the deck of a ship in international waters. Also, apparently, it includes dumping white phosphorous on women and children.

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  6. DakotabornKansan says:

    What a curious contradiction

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  7. Sligo Riverman says:

    This reminds me of all of the talk about Bill Clinton not getting the nomination again right after ’94.
    There is nobody out there who will beat Obama unless unemployment hits the teens. Younger voters will be back. And Latinos won’t change their beliefs to vote for Rubio, who is an arch conservative and far out of the mainstream.
    2012 is going to be fun.

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  8. DakotabornKansan says:

    What a curious contradiction

    Reply

  9. Don Bacon says:

    Captcha doesn’t like html so try this.
    http://tinyurl.com/3yz6b59

    Reply

  10. Don Bacon says:

    Fascinating discussion of Dem alternatives to Obama here.

    Reply

  11. Dan Kervick says:

    Sorry, Don. But I haven’t changed anything. I have run this same argument about the government in the United States being identical to the people a bunch of times before, and it’s part and parcel of my long campaign against libertarianism, and in favor of social democratic and communitarian ways of thinking. In the US system, government = self-government.
    I believe we the people do need to run a well-disciplined polity, just as a family needs to run a well-disciplined household. I also think that at the present time in US history, we need more rules and laws governing our behavior, especially our behavior in the marketplace. Self-government in 2010 is not energetic and activist enough.

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  12. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “Why Dan, I believe you have experienced an epiphany…..”
    Yeah, but he has a habit of forgittin’ them as quick as he gets ‘em. But I think he’s getting better. He musta changed his diet or something.

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  13. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Be Careful What You Wish For
    Sunday 07 November 2010
    by: William Rivers Pitt, t r u t h o u t | Op-Ed
    OK, so it’s over. The deal has gone down, and the US House of Representatives is now in the slippery hands of John Boehner and the GOP. The Senate still belongs to Harry Reid and the Democrats, but by a smaller margin, and while the House is far in the lead when it comes to having new members with certifiable brain damage, the Senate also has some members who are no slouches in Teh Crayzee department. Jim DeMint is a perfect example of the latter, and it may come to pass that DeMint will find himself at the center of a damaging GOP civil war.
    The outlines of such an intra-party conflict have been evident for a while now, and it has centered around the so-called “Tea Party.” The “Tea Party” is nothing more or less than the GOP base with a new coat of paint, claims by the “mainstream” media of this being a “movement” notwithstanding. The “Tea Party” is comprised of the exact same people who were perfectly happy to have a fundamentalist war freak in the White House during the Bush administration, and never mind the fact that Bush grew the government exponentially while preaching to the choir about “smaller government.” These are the same people who kept Bush’s approval rating from dropping below 20 percent. These are the same people who set to yowling about Terry Schiavo loud enough to get the GOP congress to mess with constitutional law. And they are the same people who think Hillary Clinton murdered Vince Foster to cover up Bill Clinton’s drug-running operation out of the Mena Airport in Arkansas, etc., etc., etc.
    That’s the “Tea Party,” and just because they changed their name and got some big money from the Koch Brothers to raise hell and screech about armed revolution doesn’t change the fact that they are the GOP base, reborn and rebranded by a compliant media that puts spectacle above substance as a matter of operational principle.
    continues…….
    http://www.truth-out.org/be-careful-what-you-wish-for64863

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  14. Don Bacon says:

    Why Dan, I believe you have experienced an epiphany and have been somehow transformed from a Hamiltonian rule-the-serfs person to a Jeffersonian we-the-people advocate. The concept of a “well-disciplined polity” is out the window! “The American people, working together, to govern themselves wisely” is in!
    Congratulations on your conversion; welcome to the club.

    Reply

  15. Dan Kervick says:

    There is no such thing as “the state”. Some people, however, think that governance is a good thing and trust in the capacity of the American people, working together, to govern themselves wisely, and to promote the general welfare through active self-government.
    The US Constitution plainly establishes that the government of the United States is an activity of the people of the United States, to be carried out according to the plan ordained by that constitution. To hate the government is to hate one’s fellow-citizens and their work as citizens, and to repudiate one’s position and responsibilities as a coequal citizen of a democratic republic.
    Of course, there are many times when the government by the people is not working. The proper response to that failure is for the people to do better and organize themselves to constitute sounder and more effective government. It is not a proper response to treat the government as though it were some sort of foreign power or invasive entity which must be defeated, subverted, drowned in a bathtub, etc.

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  16. questions says:

    “On Monday, the American Geophysical Union, the country’s largest association of climate scientists, plans to announce that 700 climate scientists have agreed to speak out as experts on questions about global warming and the role of man-made air pollution.
    …….
    “Of the more than 100 new Republican members of Congress, 50% are climate-change skeptics, according to an analysis of campaign statements by the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank.”
    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-climate-scientists-20101108,0,545056.story

    Reply

  17. questions says:

    And while I’m at it:
    http://xkcd.com/810/
    and this:
    http://xkcd.com/809/
    Lots more, but only 2 links allowed….. Sad.

    Reply

  18. questions says:

    These two guest posts from 538refugees.com are, together, the clearest, most concise reads of the issues surrounding health care reform and the ACA.
    Utterly worth the click and read. You’ll know more at the end than you did at the beginning, drew especially. Your instincts are wrong, as are your “facts” regarding ACA and regarding climate change. Your numbers are wrong, and your “understanding” of the issues is a misunderstanding.
    I realize that you very much want to be FREE and to let others be FREE and you are certain that absent government you will be FREE. Corporations are voluntary associations we either buy into or we don’t and hence we are FREE.
    Except that nothing works that way. Corporations limit your choices, but make you think you have choices because you can pick coke or pepsi or the store brand! Woohoo! Freedom, hiday, freedom!
    But you can’t actually choose to avoid participating in the pollution that corporations generate, and if there’s enough corporate control over enough aspects of our lives, you won’t be able to choose even coke or pepsi….
    Libertarianism is an adolescent illusion, a fantasy of self-sufficiency that is belied every time a teenage boy falls and needs his mummy to take him to the hospital for stitches. Suddenly he needs the public schools to have educated his doctor, he needs the student loan program to have paid for the nurse, he needs NIH to have funded research into pain relief, and he needs the feds to have paid for newer and fancier antibiotics so that his multi-drug resistant flesh-eating strep is stopped before he doesn’t have a leg anymore!
    He needs teachers, he needs the kindness of others, he needs bank regulators, he needs inspectors…. But what teenage boy wants to admit he needs anything at all, save for himself. No man is an island, but, geeze, every teenage boy sure thinks he is.
    And you have the entire field of game theory to contend with as well. Game theory covers all sorts of situations in which non-communicating parties end up pretty much fucked because they don’t coordinate their behavior. And if they try to coordinate without coercion and assurance, they still fuck up. So, basically, life sucks without the government to force us to cooperate. Funny, that.
    Below are the links:
    http://blog.538refugees.com/2010/10/11/health-insurance-isnt-really-insurance-at-all.aspx
    http://blog.538refugees.com/2010/10/21/liberty-or-healthcare-for-all.aspx

    Reply

  19. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “It is also a false premise that Americans do not provide care to the uninsured”
    As Don points out, this kind of statement is not only disingenuous, it is despicably so. This kind of callous disregard for the welfare of his fellows is a crystal clear window into the character of someone that would advance such a statement. Worse, as popular as this kind of statement is among the scum in Washington DC, and to many of the maggots infesting the ranks of the Fourth Estate, it is a window into the very soul of our nation’s leadership.

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  20. DonS says:

    “It is also a false premise that Americans do not provide care to the uninsured,” (drew). This is the same argument my nerdy little CPA nephew likes to trot out, as if it were a fact. He probably doesn’t even know of the existence of the Hill-Burton act that theoretically makes it impossible for a hospital receiving any federal funds (another no no, eh tea partiers?) to turn away anyone for lack of insurance. Hence, we note, the significant number of private hospitals who are rejecting federal funds to match their actual policies of denying services.
    Nor does this specious ‘argument’ relate to the real world in which folks without insurance don’t get treated early on for conditions or preventable disease until 911 get’s called. If the individual is still alive, the cost of treating later stage conditions skyrockets. Really good economics, eh? Nor does this ‘argument’ consider the absence of routine care and preventive care routinely unaffordable or accessible to the uninsured.
    And, relating back to my nerdy nephew, what kind of human being finds it acceptable to equate end of the line 911/’care’ for an individual who has been systematically barred from any notion of wraparound health care with anything resembling humane care? It amounts to a rhetorical “gotcha”.
    Speaking of false premises, it is a false premise to assert that a majority of Americans, 70% or whatever, have even a vague idea of what current health care bill provides. Opinions are based on the aforementioned propaganda machine that passes for ‘news’. Drew asserts a knowledge and prescience “viewed by the majority of the country” that is a laughable joke. Sounds like and argument, but it’s just a slogan.

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  21. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Note how Drew generalizes. Thats the M.O. these days, make sweeping general statements about “liberals” and “conservatives”. Shoe-horning real people into these neat little niches in order to advance some asshole partisan snippet of bullshit designed to advance political agendas that really don’t serve the interests of ANY of the common folk.
    Sooner or later the people will wake up and realize their needs and wants are not so different than their neighbor’s, and that these fuckers writing the script in DC are using partisan division to discourage universal concensus.
    Its disheartening seeing these lemmings like Drew so casually exhibiting the kind of mindset that so perfectly robs the people of any real power or representation that could be gained by general concensus.
    Oh well, it seems to be the rule rather than the exception these days. Its a a shame, because such blind ignorance has brought this nation to its knees, and if not stopped, it is doubtful that we will be able to stand ourselves back up.

    Reply

  22. drew says:

    DKB:
    I doubt you will see collaboration between liberals and tea partiers,
    because tea party-ers see the liberal, Wilsonian state as the source
    of the problem. Tea party people are localists; liberals trust the
    state. These are entirely incompatible conditions.

    Reply

  23. drew says:

    Ilona, 70% of the country rejects the health care bill because it
    imposes restrictions, complexity and compulsion that are
    incompatible with those citizens core values. It is also a false
    premise that Americans do not provide care to the uninsured,
    that America does not provide medical care to those who do not
    work, and it is a false premise further to assert that Americans
    do not support improving access to health care. You are
    asserting a false choice. As a result, the unpopular health care
    bill is viewed by a majority of the country as an unconstitutional
    intrusion in the personal lives of the citizens.
    70% of Americans reject the very notion of “climate control” as
    unscientific, since no one has ever controlled the climate (and
    the idea of “controlling climate” is so much unscientific
    nonsense), and anthropogenic warming cannot be shown to
    correlate, much less cause, climate change. There isn’t a single
    published study anywhere that takes historical data and fits this
    new thesis of carbon-based catastrophe to the actual data, much
    less show that carbon emissions are causal. It’s ideology, not
    science.
    Obama also expresses, from time to time, your mystification at
    the unpopularity of many of his ideas. With luck, some day, he
    will either change his ideas to fit his constituency, or he will
    change his constituency to win support for his ideas. I’m
    thinking it will be the latter.

    Reply

  24. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Don nailed it.
    Surely there is a word for “greed” in the German language? Universal health care requires curbing the obscene costs associated with health care. And those who profit the most are those who can absorb the personal costs of healthcare without hardship.
    And these pieces of shit in Washington DC, who decide this issue for us, haven’t got a clue what it is like to sacrifice EVERYTHING because you have a serious health issue, or to ignore symptoms of serious illness because you cannot affored diagnosis and treatment.
    As far as the peons supporting policies that actually work against their own interests??? Blame a “Fourth Estate” that long ago ceased performing its role, becoming instead the corporate drummer for its political masters. Ignorance is bliss among the population of the United States, and that ignorance is carefully nurtured by the media and the DC scriptwriters.
    Don mentions Palin. The ignorance of the general populace is not the only segment of our tiered society that is being carefully and purposely rendered dumbfuck. We now see polticians whose ignorance goes hand in hand with malleability, who are so fuckin’ stupid that they are unable to see how their egos are played by the real power brokers in Washington and the global Corporatocracy. Led around like hapless buffoons, these embarrassing ignorant assholes are marched in front of us as if they are just simple commonfolk, heedful of our needs and interests. Nothing more than puppets, led to believe that they will get their hands on true power, they represent a HUGE danger to our nation, as the actual manipulators and power brokers become further hidden from view. The Tea Party is an excellent example of this phenomena.

    Reply

  25. DonS says:

    “I have a hard time to understand why many in the US do not want health care insurance for every body. ”
    Ilona, as an American I wish I could give you a simple answer to your question about health care. And there are several generally simple answers, none of which is very flattering to Americans. But perhaps one of the biggest factors is that Americans are fast losing their sense of social responsibility. Greed and selfishness are increasing, which are of course related to money. So at the root is a shallow relationship to money, although opposition to universal health care is dressed up in many other fancy ideas.
    Why do so many people who are not very wealthy, and can’t take care of their health needs as the rich can, seem to agree with those who have great wealth? Perhaps that is the real question, which also has many possible answers, but maybe boils down to the fact that many Americans have become used to listening to short and simple answers that lead them to see their world as being part of a team, like a football team. You choose a side to give allegiance, and that is all that matters; you believe in the team; the teams is made up of only good and smart and right people (I am being ironic of course). Thinking doesn’t matter; logic doesn’t matter. What matters in emotional connection to being on the winning side that your favorite cheerleader, most of whom are conservative rabble rousers like Rush Limbaugh or Glen Beck or Sean Hannity, or Sarah Palin, etc. etc., tells you about. Everything else is about ‘losers’ and ‘socialists.
    By the way, here is an interesting article I just ran across that sort of asks and answers questions like your with regard to taxes and public infrastructure:
    http://firedoglake.com/2010/11/07/taxation-and-privatization/

    Reply

  26. ilona says:

    I am German and do not fully understand the ways of election and all behind it. For me and most of my european friends Obamas plans sound very good and look like the right way and right direction.
    (health care, environment protection etc) I have a hard time to understand why many in the US do not want health care insurance for every body. In Europe this is an important point and has high value. Same with climate control.

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  27. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “Can Progressives and Tea Partiers Find Common Ground?”
    Yes, there is ONE, and ONE only, issue that all of Washington can join hands in supporting. That is the continued policy of supporting the crimes and human rights abuses of a racist and murderous state known as “Israel”. History will not be kind to us as it records our complicity in Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians. I protest even one dime of my tax money going to these murderous bastards in Israel.
    http://globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=21799
    WAR CRIMES: ISRAELI GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS SHOW DELIBERATE POLICY TO KEEP GAZANS AT NEAR STARVATION LEVELS.
    by Saed Bannoura
    Global Research, November 7, 2010
    Documents whose existence were denied by the Israeli government for over a year have been released after a legal battle led by Israeli human rights group Gisha. The documents reveal a deliberate policy by the Israeli government in which the dietary needs for the population of Gaza are chillingly calculated, and the amounts of food let in by the Israeli government measured to remain just enough to keep the population alive at a near-starvation level. This documents the statement made by a number of Israeli officials that they are “putting the people of Gaza on a diet”.
    Calculation sheet from newly-released documents (image from Gisha)
    (CLICK ON LINK, ABOVE, TO VIEW IMAGE)
    In 2007, when Israel began its full siege on Gaza, Dov Weisglass, adviser to then Prime-Minister Ehud Olmert, stated clearly,

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  28. DakotabornKansan says:

    Can Progressives and Tea Partiers Find Common Ground?
    [as the tea party impulse generates a new third party and attacks the Republicans for not keeping their word on fiscal, tax, monetary, and regulatory reform.

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  29. Don Bacon says:

    Being a crook and a traitor to America is hardly unique in Washington, and the results are plain to see.

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  30. Charlie says:

    Jeb Bush and his secretary of state committed voter fraud in Florida to give his brother the election. The entire Bush family are crooks and traitors to America.

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  31. jonst says:

    I’ll tell ya this Steve, this nation deserves another Bush in the White House. Farce replaces tragedy.

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  32. drew says:

    Sorry. Continuing:
    … as the tea party impulse generates a new third party and attacks
    the Republicans for not keeping their word on fiscal, tax, monetary,
    and regulatory reform.

    Reply

  33. drew says:

    I discount Bush because we are living in an era now where being
    an experienced steady government hand is a negative, not a
    positive. I think the country, faced with a Bush entry, will shrug
    and say, “I’ve already seen that movie and it didn’t end very well.”
    It’s fine if Bush is McConnell’s secret enthusiasm, but I don’t
    think even half of the mainstream republicans are trusting of
    McConnell, and very few of the tea partiers. Since the
    republicans can’t win in 2012 without honoring the tea party
    priorities, I think this Bush candidacy is a political surmise
    constructed on strategies that expired a decade ago.
    Romney will have more problems with the Christian right than
    any Catholic. Faith-based religionists are more skeptical of what
    they term Mormon heresy than the institutional Catholic church.
    There’s little evidence that anyone here is a practicing Christian,
    but in short, the thing you have to bear in mind is that any
    Christian believing in the inerrancy of scripture simply cannot
    reconcile his faith with the book of Mormon. Romney cannot
    appeal to conservative Christians on the basis of faith, imv, only
    on the basis of values. This is demonstrated in Romney’s futility
    to win or even do much at all in the Iowa caucuses. It looks as
    though he’s working hard now to find a way to skip those
    caucuses, because he knows that Palin and Huckabee will clean
    up. Polling in the Des Moines Register says otherwise right now,
    to the detriment of my argument. But Romney got his clock
    cleaned in Iowa last time.
    There is a certainty with Washington professionals that
    Republican leadership will coopt and steer the tea party
    movement, and thus we will have a lot of these stories about
    which appointed/annointed conventional sort will will the
    republican nomination. There’s an awful lot of evidence (cf.
    Luntz polling) that this is preposterous: it simply assures the
    destruction of the new Republican coalition by this time next
    year.
    Watch Rubio’s video address from yesterday. Someone like Rubio
    will emerge and the Republican establishment will support him
    or her because the alternative will be Palin or Huckabee. Either
    that or the Republican Party will collapse as the tea party
    impulse genera

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  34. Gene says:

    I rather doubt that will happen. Bush is a catholic with strong links with the KoC and all that. He will not be trusted by ‘the Establishment’, even if he allies himself with the upcoming Rubio, currently an evangelical but still formerly a devout catholic. Last time I checked, the Vatican and Israel were not great buddies.

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  35. Reba Shimansky says:

    The Bush name is loathed by Americans. The two Bush bums have destroyed this country.We do do not need another Bushbum as president.
    Also I have told by people in the media that his personal life is a mess.

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  36. Don Bacon says:

    Plus Romney fell to the lackluster McCain, who was considered to be a RINO by many.

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  37. nadine says:

    Romney has three large millstones around his neck wigwag: his religion, his inability to connect with the voters, and Romneycare, for which he’s never done a mea culpa. I think they be insurmountable obstacles to him.

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  38. Don Bacon says:

    Except Silky Sullivan was not a champion, either, even though Steve promotes Silky three times.
    Still I’m amazed that Steve Clemons would know about a horse that ran in my era but before Steve was even born. So I’m impressed (again) with Steve’s virtuosity, and I say that irregardless of the generous stipend that he provides.
    What’s next, an ode to Petraeus, Man O’War?

    Reply

  39. WigWag says:

    Steve is entirely correct. If Jeb Bush seeks the Republican nomination in 2012 he has a chance of receiving it. Both Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney have an excellent chances of defeating Obama in 2012.
    I’m not sure that Jeb could actually wrest the nomination from Mitt though. I think alot of the very large Republican donors who have been very generous to the Bush family over the years are experiencing Bush fatigue and that Jeb might find it alot harder to have the terrific fundraising success that his father and brother did.
    Romney is already well along in the process of locking up the country club Republican set; the Republicans who work on Wall Street or in the hedge fund business and live on 5th Avenue, in Greenwich or in Westchester County are already lining up behind Romney. Within 6 months it will already be too late for Bush to recruit a sufficient number of large givers to make his campaign viable.
    While Bush has a chance, if I were a betting man, I’d be strongly predisposed to bet on Romeny securing the nomination and perhaps winning the presidency.

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  40. DakotabornKansan says:

    Does the nation really want to go down that path again? One would hope not!
    Bush III? Entitlement, elitism, privilege, secrecy, mediocrity, corruption, financial cronyism, bailouts of family failures by the taxpayers – these are

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  41. Don Bacon says:

    We haven’t had a signatory to the PNAC Statement of Principles run for president since Gary Bauer (2000) and Steve Forbes (1996 & 2000). Even brother George didn’t do that.
    So perhaps with Jeb at the helm the currently moribund PNAC could be revived along with the pursuit of the global American Empire. There are some who would say that we can’t afford it, but I say just print the money and go for it.

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  42. questions says:

    Well, if the research in this article is correct, watch out USA:
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sc-cons-1104-karp-20101104,0,2964832.story
    “Purchasing power
    How much money we’re willing to spend on ourselves versus others depends on how powerful we feel at the moment we decide, according to researchers Derek D. Rucker, David Dubois and Adam D. Galinsky at Northwestern University.
    In a paper, “Generous Paupers and Stingy Princes,” they reveal that people who feel powerful when they’re buying spend more on themselves and less on others.
    In one experiment, participants preconditioned to feel powerful were willing to spend 46 percent more on themselves than those who felt low power. Conversely, low-power people were willing to spend more on others and less on themselves. The pattern held across five experiments.”
    ****
    (There are other interesting bits as well.)
    *****
    Those “high power” Republicans are going to spend, ummm, 46% more on themselves than would the fem dems…..
    According to various kos diaries, the new pub govs are cutting all sorts of programs all over the place, rail, service…. Better to spend the money on themselves than to provide jobs.
    Also of note, more trucks than cars sold in the last accounting period for the first time in a while. Signs of pent up consumer demand, POWER, and an inability to make oneself drive a Prius for one goddamned more second….
    Our public mood cycles are a thing to behold. People really only can take so much of being forward thinking, of planning, of carrying concern for others before they simply burst.
    We burst with this last election.
    But now we’re so powerful that….
    Note the unemployment figures by education level, by the way. Really sad. Over 15% w/o h.s. diploma, and just under 5% with at least a BA.
    So where’s Jebbie in all of this? Powerful.

    Reply

  43. Barrt says:

    “Stay Out of the Bushes”
    - Jesse Jackson

    Reply

  44. nadine says:

    “Bush wasn’t included on the list. Neither for that matter was Mitch Daniels, who I think would make an attractive candidate on many levels — but again is probably not someone the Tea Party crowd would go for. ”
    I disagree. Mitch Daniels has an excellent fiscal record. Like Chris Christie, the Tea Party could go for him if he proves his ability to run at the Presidential level. How about a Daniels/Rubio ticket? That might have some appeal.

    Reply

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