Juggler Moms Appreciate Joe Biden

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joe biden twn 2000.jpg
And you thought he was just good at foreign policy. . .
Working Mother Magazine — the journal of record for what Obama senior policy adviser Karen Kornbluh called “the juggler family” and a place to learn about “the mommy tax” — has honored Joe Biden with its “Best of Congress Award.”
From the magazine:

Senator Joseph R. Biden, Jr., D-Delaware
Staffers 76
Working-mom staffers 16

What we love A U.S. senator for nearly 36 years, he puts kids’ health, safety and education at the top of his priorities list.
A-Plus Education Advocate Sen. Biden worked with Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) on the Facilitating Outstanding Classrooms Using Size Reduction (FOCUS) Act, which would provide $2 billion in funding to hire 100,000 new teachers so that class size would be reduced to an average of 18 students, especially in the early grades. This legislation would ensure that reducing class size wouldn’t mean having to compete for funding with teacher and administrator professional development and training.
Women’s Health Support Along with his wife, Jill, Biden has been a longtime leader in the fight against breast cancer.
They helped establish the Biden Breast Health Initiative in 1993 to educate young women across Delaware on the importance of proper breast health and the importance of early detection. The program has educated more than 6,000 Delaware high schoolers since it was started.

I’ve been punching myself to think through whether there is a VP sleeper nominee out there I haven’t figured out or seen. The only one I don’t have a fix on is Virginia Governor Tim Kaine — but logic leads me to think that while Obama likes him and considers him “close,” Obama will not choose him in part for those reasons.
My gut — which is usually right — is telling me Biden will be Obama’s vice presidential running mate.
– Steve Clemons

Comments

33 comments on “Juggler Moms Appreciate Joe Biden

  1. Don Bacon says:

    Biden (good at foreign policy): Let’s spend a billion US taxpayer dollars to rebuild a former Soviet republic, the birthplace of Joseph Stalin.
    That starts the bidding, and now the US will also budget billions more for ships, tanks and airplanes to counter this ongoing threat to a former Soviet republic, birthplace of Joseph Stalin. That’s change you can believe in (if you’re nuts).

    Reply

  2. Carroll says:

    Posted by KR Aug 19, 4:34PM
    Well I suggest you are showing that you don’t totally understand what happen in the Georgian – Russian conflict or the history behind it or the reasons for the Georgia-Ossestia disconnect or why the US would use this two bit conflict to exhume the old USSR.
    Déjà vu is the soup du jour of our brain calcified leaders.

    Reply

  3. JR, Boston says:

    As for Georgia and Russia, the first casualty in war is always the truth. We can, however, understand motivations.
    If Sen. McCain were a true foreign policy expert – and wasn’t lifting his ideas from wikipedia – he would have convinced Pres. Bush to keep Saakashvili and his temper – and his ambitions in South Ossetia – in check. Then again, maybe a bad temper can’t always be checked. Perhaps that is the instructive lesson here for us, and for Sen. McCain himself.
    Saakashvili overplayed his hand. Russia will annex Georgia’s breakaway Republic, destroy Georgia’s economy, and, eventually, get rid of our guy, Saakashvili. And there’s little, short of sending troops in, that we can do about it.
    Except make sure that the same scenario doesn’t play out in Ukraine.

    Reply

  4. Dan Kervick says:

    “While the Russian government has claimed that the Georgian military was engaged in a “genocide” in the region of South Ossetia, Biden said he did not see any evidence of it on his trip.”
    Oh, for the love of … Did Biden even visit Tskhinvali or any other parts of South Ossetia??!!!

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  5. Carroll says:

    Never mind.
    This answers my question on Biden.
    ‘Biden Calls for $1 Billion in Emergency Aid to Georgia’
    Fresh off a trip to the Republic of Georgia, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Joe Biden said he will ask for $1 billion in emergency aid for the war torn country.
    Biden, who is rumored to be very high on Sen. Barack Obama’s list of running mates, met with Georgia’s president and prime minister on the trip, further burnishing his foreign policy credentials ahead of Obama’s decision.
    “I left the country convinced that Russia’s invasion of Georgia may be the one of the most significant event to occur in Europe since the end of communism,” said Biden.
    “When Congress reconvenes, I intend to work with the administration to seek Congressional approval for $1 billion in emergency assistance for Georgia, with a substantial down payment on that aid to be included in the Congress’ next supplemental spending bill.”
    While the Russian government has claimed that the Georgian military was engaged in a “genocide” in the region of South Ossetia, Biden said he did not see any evidence of it on his trip.
    Biden said the $1 billion would “help the people of Georgia to rebuild their country and preserve its democratic institutions.”
    The senator also issued a terse warning to the former Soviet Union, saying that “Russia’s actions in Georgia will have consequences.”
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    And of course these taxpayer financed master of the universe plays starring the Biden’s of our government will have no consequences for the US.
    Obama’s once reasonable sounding virtue of taking ‘all views into consideration’ now looks like it will be his biggest governing vice. If Biden is his pick to “depend on for foreign policy advice” I have no idea what Obama actually stands for now.

    Reply

  6. JR, Boston says:

    If it’s true that the mainstream media has the dirt on McCain and is planning on releasing it, see: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/17/opinion/17rich.html?_r=1&ref=opinion&oref=slogin
    then that frees up Sen. Obama to select a VP he feels most comfortable working with.
    He knows that he’s going to win the election or lose the election based on how we he runs his campaign. And he knows that he’ll (likely) be judged in four or eight years on how well his Admin has delivered on its promises. So he’ll want someone who will buy into the program, support it 100%, and be a solid partner.
    Tim Kaine.

    Reply

  7. KR says:

    My gut tells me that the recent conflict between Georgia and Russia, ought to force Obama and his campaign to seriously re-evaluate his calculations in choosing the next VP.
    As a DEM, who’ll vote for Obama, I don’t feel “comfortable” with their fp and ns judgments in confronting Russia and its bearish political and military posturing.
    A DEM ticket comprised of 2 northerners, neither with military cred’s and experience? That could be a major miscalculation in the coming months. I suspect that Biden understands that,.. but his presence in Georgia offers no assurance however superficial that he or Obama know how best to deal with Russia.
    Imo, Russia has no intent on leaving. Tim Toles cartoon may illustrate why:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/opinion/ssi/images/Toles/c_08192008_520.gif

    Reply

  8. Ernst says:

    Seriously, @ Don Bacon and Joe M. why on earth should people take you two serious on Biden’s qualifications if neither of seem to understand the definition of a Federal republic
    At least try to stay within reasonable limits when distorting a politicians record.

    Reply

  9. ed says:

    Tahoe Editor:
    I ain’t talking about Clark this time (although if speaking truth to douchebags is the reason he’s out, that still stinks). I’m talking about the self-indulgent, bandwagon jumping jackassery of the sentence, “My gut — which is usually right — is telling me Biden will be Obama’s vice presidential running mate.” But self-indulgent jackasery (of all sorts) is the norm for posts ’round these parts.

    Reply

  10. Forest Ranger says:

    Obama’s first objective is to win, and then, he can focus on change. Picking a Washington insider like Biden, therefore, helps on two fronts: 1) mitigating the experience factor; and 2) enabling change if he wins. From this perspective, it is not a bad choice.

    Reply

  11. KR says:

    Well, I don’t mind if it’s Biden. In fact, I had supported him during the primaries.
    But, I just expect that all this hype for Obama’s Veep will deflate my enthusiasm following the announcement, if it’s him. It’s like looking forward to the unveiling of Detroits next generation concept car, and watching them come out with a modified hummer that runs on tortilla chips.
    I doubt that it’ll motivate me towards activism, particularly, if it’s not about real change. I am disappointed though.
    KR

    Reply

  12. Carroll says:

    Explain to me how being on a foreigns relations committee makes one ‘good’ at foreign relations.
    I need some examples of something real he has done or position he has taken that shows he is ‘good’ at influencng US policy for the better.
    ‘Better or Good’ meaning what the US public would like to see concerning not wasting our resources on spreading capitalism or intervening and creating loser wars and stirring up s*** pots around the world.
    I am serious I really want to know.
    All that the talking heads and bloggers say is he would be good becuase he knows the names of all the players abroad and has been around forever.

    Reply

  13. ed says:

    “My gut — which is usually right — is telling me Biden will be Obama’s vice presidential running mate.”
    Wow! Tell us more about how awesome you are!
    Really, all this seems like is late bandwagon jumping than any limb climbing. Last week you were crowing Bayh.
    Please enlighten us with other demonstrable examples of when your awesome gut was prescient. Usain Bolt doesn’t preen this much, but at least he brings results.

    Reply

  14. Tahoe Editor says:

    Picking a gray-haired Washington establishment man with questionable foreign-policy judgment (“let’s cut Iraq into pieces”) and consistently tepid support (cf every Democratic presidential primary) because Obama never got around to holding a Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee hearing — this is “Judgment We Can Believe In”?
    Can you really picture Joe Biden parroting the Hopey Changey line from now until November?
    http://www.politicalcartoons.com/cartoon/5b2ffe4a-9693-41af-8093-187b57e339fa.html
    http://www.politicalcartoons.com/cartoon/771b0723-60c8-412f-bfd5-b15cae681800.html
    http://www.politicalcartoons.com/cartoon/03d1652b-dd73-46f0-bda4-2b74353abefc.html
    Of course Barry was quick to excuse Joe for these remarks. But when Hillary said “it took a president to get it done,” boy did she need to be hammered for her “unfortunate” and “ill-advised” comments — the foundation for the 4-page Clintons-are-racists memo the Obama campaign put together to secure its S.C. victory.

    Reply

  15. ColeD says:

    Sen. Robert Byrd of West Virginia. Final answer.

    Reply

  16. DonS says:

    Biden is a bit too self absorbed and flamboyant for my preference. Kaine is perhpas dull, but reasonably solid, and get’s reasonable marks in the Virginia governorship in the face of Republican smear machine.
    Bidens vaunted “foreign plicy experience” doesn’t impress me all that much because he has too much of a stake in it, i.e., personalizes his views, rather than professionalizes, if that makes any sense!

    Reply

  17. Nobcentral says:

    I still like Al Gore as the sleeper pick. He’d be great for many reasons that are so obvious that they don’t need to be mentioned. Don’t think it would happen but I seriously can’t think of a better choice.

    Reply

  18. Josh R. says:

    “On sleeper nominees — is there anyone from the purpling west who would be unde consideration?”
    I’ve been pimping the name of Brian Schweitzer, Gov. of Montana, since the beginning of the VeepStakes. He hasn’t received any press lately though so I’m not certain how much he’s been discussed, but I think he would be a good candidate. He’s a popular governor of a Red State with a Republican Lt. Gov – in other words, someone who can work well with others (bipartisanship!), not from the Beltway (change!), and is from the Mountain States area of the country (likely won’t by himself bring any states, but can help make further in roads in the region). Not too enthused about his stance on coal, but, sad to say, a politician from a coal state (or from a corn state) probably isn’t going to be the best bet on energy anyways – part and parcel of doing business there.

    Reply

  19. Kathleen says:

    ooops…dtf8gg

    Reply

  20. Rob says:

    Steve,
    Wes Clark?
    I know Obama’s team told him not to even show up at the DNC but could this be a head fake?

    Reply

  21. Kathleen says:

    I like Joe Biden… I really do, but how old will he be in 8 years? The Veep has to be someone who can run as an incumbent in 8 years.

    Reply

  22. Joe M. says:

    Don Bacon is right. But Just to point out even more than he did, Biden is an open advocate of splitting Iraq into three countries, how could Obama put him on the ticket with that view? The entire Iraq discussion will be focused on that, and how it is different than Obama’s stated position. It’s not like Biden is flexible about his position, he is outspoken about it.
    And, just in general, he is not good at foreign policy, he is simply an establishment thinker on foreign policy.
    I think Biden would be a very bland choice in policy terms (with the Iraq down side), he is too much of a loud mouth and thus dangerous.
    I don’t see why Bill Richardson is not better than Biden in every way. Richardson has executive experience in a state that is in play, has more foreign policy experience, and is also a “change” candidate. The only thing against Richardson is that he is too nice and won’t pick a fight. But that is probably more Obama’s style anyway.

    Reply

  23. questions says:

    On sleeper nominees — is there anyone from the purpling west who would be under consideration? Not sure regional thinking matters much, but if it does count for something, Obama needs southern and western support to rewrite the map. The south he’s working on through vote registration/turnout. The west? I don’t know. Read a kos thing on Colorado and water use and McCain — the piece made it seem that McC has kissed Colorado goodbye over water issues. Maybe there’s a veep out of this issue?

    Reply

  24. questions says:

    On sleeper nominees — is there anyone from the purpling west who would be unde consideration? Not sure regional thinking matters much, but if it does count for something, Obama needs southern and western support to rewrite the map. The south he’s working on through vote registration/turnout. The west? I don’t know. Read a kos thing on Colorado and water use and McCain — the piece made it seem that McC has kissed Colorado goodbye over water issues. Maybe there’s a veep out of this issue?

    Reply

  25. Dan Kervick says:

    And Clinton symbolizes “change”? She’s been in Washington since 1993, and would be a continuation of an administration that has already served 8 years. Isn’t it time to turn the page?

    Reply

  26. Don Bacon says:

    Biden is good at foreign policy? He’s good on Iran, but he voted for the Iraq war and then proposed breaking up Iraq. Currently he’s talking trash about Russia regarding Georgia, a former Soviet Republic that the US shouldn’t be committed to defending against Russia. Bring on war with Russia — real smart, Joe. We’ll be able to use those additional troops that Obama wants.

    Reply

  27. susan says:

    Steve,
    tell me how anyone can possibly square Obama’s rhetoric about
    hope and change with Biden, who in Washington DC terms is about
    as ossified as they come. I don’t disagree that he’s good on foreign
    policy, but I don’t recall that he was particularly opposed to the Iraq
    invasion.
    I have yet to see anybody who’s been considered who is equal to or
    surpasses Clinton in terms of qualifications or experience. Given
    the dynamics of the race between Obama and McCain over the
    summer, if Obama really wants to win this, he should pick her.

    Reply

  28. Kathleen says:

    I like Joe Biden… I really do, but how old will he be in 8 years? The Veep has to be someone who can run as an incumbent in 8 years.

    Reply

  29. Matt says:

    Well, Biden wouldn’t be too surprising, but I am still putting my money on Cookie Monster.

    Reply

  30. Dan Kervick says:

    I have no gut feelings at all about whom will be selected, although I would personally prefer Kaine to Biden.
    My real worry is this: The Obama campaign has not tried to downplay the VP selection or reduce expectations. Instead they have been hyping it with things like the test messaging gimmick. (I don’t text, but I learned the other day that my son has been signed up for a long time to get the message.) They seem to be aiming for a real boost from this selection, and are trying to generate a lot of excitement with it.
    The problem is that I just don’t see any exciting Democrats out there. Of all the people who are frequently mentioned as candidates, the public reaction among progressives is likely to range from boredom and ambivalence, on the one hand, to dissension and outrage, on the other. And I don’t sense there is some middle-of-the-road Democrat who fires the imagination of centrists either. Plus, the VP position itself is greatly overhyped and overrated.
    What with the Obama vacation, the time-consuming VP pick, and the time-consuming convention preparations, the public face of the campaign has been quiet and unfocused lately. Although it’s not unusual for things to be very quiet in August in Washington and American politics. I’ll be happy when this VP process is over so they can get back to pounding their message, attacking John McCain and making some news.

    Reply

  31. lurker says:

    Biden will be an excellent choice.

    Reply

  32. apu says:

    “I mean, you got the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy,” Biden said.
    Facing criticism, potential 2008 presidential candidate Joe Biden has been forced to explain his recent remark that “you cannot go to a 7-Eleven or a Dunkin’ Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent.”

    Reply

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