Some News & New Grooves in DC

-

joel rubin.jpgmargarettalev_photo.jpgCD headshot final WEB-1.jpg
Today, I received alerts that three friends had taken new positions.
National Security Network Deputy Director Joel Rubin is no longer with the National Security Network, a great organization that is smartening Dems up on foreign policy. Rubin, now Director of Policy and Government Affairs at the Ploughshares Fund, will work with the very cool nuclear truth-teller Joseph Cirincione. Awesome move for Rubin whose smart spouse, Nilmini Rubin, works as head of international economic policy stuff on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (for the Republicans). Yep, the Mary Matalin and James Carville of foreign policy.
Margaret Talev, White House Correspondent for McClatchy News, has now moved to Bloomberg to be — White House Correspondent. I wonder if she gets a chair a bit closer to Jay Carney’s podium. Congrats Margaret!
Then, Charles Dunne of the Middle East Institute has just become Head of Middle East North Africa affairs for Freedom House.
Lots of news moves in town. And then there is my news.
atlantic banner.jpg
A big new adventure for The Washington Note and me has arrived with the brilliant team at the Atlantic Media Group. I will be the new Washington editor-at-large of The Atlantic and editor-in-chief of Atlantic Live, the global events division of Atlantic Media.
I will continue as Senior Fellow and Founder of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, and The Washington Note will move into the family of blogs at The Atlantic and be integrated into the main site.
Very cool. Very excited. I think that like the New America Foundation, Atlantic Media is one of the most densely populated places on the planet of what owner David Bradley calls “extreme talent.”
Stay tuned.
– Steve Clemons

Comments

41 comments on “Some News & New Grooves in DC

  1. questions says:

    Weiner’s downfall:
    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/07/hottttt-said-the-woman-behind-the-me-photo/?hp
    This is pretty damning — makes him look like the aggressor, makes his lies worse.
    Wonder if he has a dog.

    Reply

  2. questions says:

    Food fight! This one internal to the mind of a retired sociology prof from the UIC — it has been taken up at monkey cage, and probably all around the web. And it looks like his former colleagues have responded to keep the good (food) fight alive.
    http://www.weeklystandard.com/articles/fat-city_567621.html?page=1
    The basic idea, near as I can tell, is that a somewhat conservative sociologist put in medium effort at a medium school for a medium career and got a decent pension out of it. He taught his classes (not super hard for him), he read a bunch of stuff (not super hard for him), he published some stuff (not super hard for him) and then he retired at 64 on 80% of full salary in a state where there’s no SoSec for public employees, so he has a state retirement instead of SoSec. And he thinks it’s a sweet deal, and paid for on the backs of low income and no income state tax payers, whom he is, of course, completely concerned with. Unless he’s not.
    He’s pretty sure his main project for life has been himself and his own pleasures, and nice as that is, it shouldn’t be what tax payers pay for. He’s pretty sure his students haven’t learned anything much after second year studies (there’s some book out to this effect). He’s pretty sure his colleagues are all partisan and pushing their partisan line in the classroom at the expense of those who don’t agree with that partisan line. (Check out the asides regarding Joe Feagin, a sociologist who focuses on race issues.) He’s pretty sure state-supported research universities are largely a scam on tax payers who get nothing in return for the expense.
    That’s a lot of self-loathing for one 64 or 65 year old retired sociologist. And it’s a lot of concern for the very poor tax payers who are ripped off. That’s a lot of concern from a seeming-Republican (I don’t really know the guy’s affiliation, but given his using the Weekly Standard, and his damning the dem donations from university faculty, it’s not an unlikely conclusion….)
    At any rate, beyond one guy’s self-loathing for his field, for the worth of his scholarship, for the value he gives to his students, there are some important questions underlying the fussing.
    Who pays for research? What is research? Does research have to be of direct benefit or be considered a waste? Is the public sphere incapable of doing anything right? If the private sphere does something, is it automatically good, just because it’s private, and after all, businessmen are always smart?
    What’s a reasonable salary? What should it be like to have a pension? Is there any real cost difference between “public” and “private” sectors? I mean, I’m kind of implicated in Goldman Sachs pensions and in the damage that hedge funds and the securitization markets did. I am on the hook for some percentage of the billions that billionaires have, and it’s not like I really like being someone who helps out the rentier class. I pretty much need the services I purchase (networking effects, not physical/caloric “needs” but needs nonetheless).
    So if I’m on the hook for the billionaires (nothing is really “private” when it comes to the kinds of losses these people brought about), then why worry about being on the hook for whatever prof’s pension in whatever state for whatever amount?
    Yes, indeed, tuition and taxes do indeed subsidize people’s careers. The money we pay out for pretty much anything is pretty much profit for someone else. All those someone elses are pretty much as phony as I am or as the next guy is. And they are phony on vacation, in retirement, while traveling. It seems like this retired sociologist is just now discovering what’s obvious to pretty much everyone.
    We’re all a little fake, all a little undeserving of comfort, all “sinners”, none a saint, all failing to live up to our superego’s image of what we should be, all failing to perform our duty in the Kantian fashion, all immoral. And yet, we roll along trying to satisfy our egos through our labor and our testifying to the value of that labor. We all try to act as if we’re indispensable, even though, let’s face it, we’re pretty much disposable, interchangeable, and unnecessary. And to cope, we sometime give in to the id (see Weiner/wiener), and we sometimes damn the whole system though we are a part of it (see retired sociologist attack his profession once he’s retired).
    It’s an odd cognitive dissonance that we have to keep — valuing our not very valuable lives.
    And it may be the primary duty in a way. For if we do not hold to some kind of value in what we do we end up in either the comedy of the ridiculous, which is fine, or the tragedy of the nihilist, which can be pretty destructive.
    The retired sociology prof is a tragic figure who only seems to be trying to rescue the rest of us from a tragedy. In fact, I get the feeling, he is lashing out in partisan rage, for revenge, against a system he sees no point in, a system he has taken advantage of, and a system he would like to destroy regardless of the good it sometimes manages. It is this system that has caused him to live a dissolute life of the pure pleasure of the mind, as if he were a drunken fool, a debauched gambler, a petty criminal. The system corrupted him by making him do easy research, and it wouldn’t let him be truly valuable. Or so it seems.
    The small amount of money that would be refunded to tax payers through the jettisoning of state universities and colleges, minus the job losses, minus the multiplier effects, minus the social mobility, minus the inspired students, minus the joy of discovery that really does matter to people, minus the opportunities for middle income people to spend a few years living the life of the mindless mind, minus the jolts to local economies…. Doesn’t much seem worth it to me to cut back on subsidies. Indeed, I personally think branch campuses of state universities should have more support. It’d be nice for many more people to have the opportunity to get inspired. They won’t all get inspired. Some will, though. And for some, the dream is a good thing to realize.
    It’s ok to send some middling students to school and have them waste resources. We will never know in advance who is capable of being inspired. So we should, as a society, be trying to inspire everyone. There’s a lot out there worth learning. Why shut off the discovery? Why make everything feel a lot like a vocational high school, with overworked teachers who aren’t going to inspire anyone under these conditions?
    And if he wouldn’t be so radical as to close down universities and colleges, but would very much like to see lower salaries, higher teaching loads, less one-on-one attention for the working class and middle class students who don’t quite make it into Hahvahd, well, that’s pretty bad too. And, sadly, it’s where it’s all going anyway. We are in the process of giving up a national gem, just as this sociology professor would like. It’s a Republican dream to get rid of the pillars of democratic party politics. And maybe that’s a bigger issue than the others for this retired sociologist. Who knows. After Wiener, I’m staying away from CT-thinking for a few days!
    Perhaps there are some other ways to handle his complaints?

    Reply

  3. questions says:

    Today’s media ramblings….
    Weiner has not ever been popular and the proof of that is that he’s not being vigorously defended. The worst he did, Pareene and others have this right, is legitimating even a corner of the Breitbartian universe. He may have done a favor to all future, umm, Members, by showing the very clear path every sext will now make to the Breitbart universe. Hey, people, don’t take that pic, and certainly DON’T send it! And if you have, ummm, might as well resign now, as it’s gonna come public. One of the women Weiner sexted was advised by a friend to go to Breitbart. Assuming he’s now the destination of choice, I’d guess we’ll see a few more of these in the coming Friedman units.
    Gentlemen, don’t start your engines. Leave the cameras off. Until you leave office.
    *****
    There’s an interesting piece up at Thoma from FRBSF about what money is, and what money velocity is, and how credit card debt is different from what traditional money thinking covers:
    “The first major difference between monetary policy today and policy of a generation or so ago is that our decisions have had less and less to do with monetary aggregates, such as M1. This reflects the fact that payments technology has changed so dramatically over the past 50 years.”
    ***
    Also, there’s a link to Jared Bernstein’s graphs that show productivity and job growth by sector. Health and education jobs keep up with the times, but the other sectors are falling down.
    Some suggestions of technology’s making workers unnecessary.
    These graphs get at the issue of the lump of labor fallacy that, say, DeLong brings up over and over again. For DeLong, the fact that we employed and paid huge numbers of people before we didn’t employ and pay them would suggest that no, the bust has nothing to do with these kinds of sector issues. Indeed, every bit of technology that cuts employment ends up creating employment elsewhere, with the disruption’s being limited to particular sectors.
    There’s a tension here that maybe could do with a concept like “lump of crucial labor” — during booms, we do a lot of non-crucial consumption. We buy, build, make, waste a lot of junk. We go places we don’t need to, we are frivolous. We have fun. No lumps here! There’s always a new thrill! Sky diving, ocean diving, spelunking, music lessons, ballroom dancing, yoga, bigger houses, newer kitchens and baths, extra houses to rent out, vacation houses, bigger cars…. No lumps when all the money in the world is yours via a credit card or securitized debt!
    BUT, maybe the lump comes back when we focus on necessities as the credit lines run out. Maybe there really is only so much labor we need when we’re dealing with needs rather than with frivolity.
    And maybe, once the flow of money slows a bit and the heavier particles can no longer be carried by the current and so fall out in deltas along the river of money, (??!), maybe that’s when we see frivolity stop. And we suddenly realize we’ve spent a million bucks on a house no one really needs, and we’ve renovated the kitchen, tossed our kids into private schools, purchased the cars and wardrobes of our dreams, gotten jobs at the U of C law and med schools…. (sound familiar?!), and we still have hefty student loans to pay off.
    So we’ve pickle-barreled ourselves. And we have to cut back, which really does suck, let’s face it.
    And we take our lumps (of labor), and we carp about tax increases that might help other people, but that will constrain our spending a bit. And given that we’ve been spending way more than we’ve been making, ummm, every cut hurts.
    Couple this dynamic with social resentment, and you get a little bit of our economic mess. Perhaps.
    ****
    Goolsbee’s out. Does this herald a change in economic policy? Does it mean the abandonment of the sort of make space for the right while tracking not very far left, or does it mean even more of a rightward tilt? Do I know?
    The essential problem with our economic policy is that the right wing rhetoric machine speaks too much to our national fantasies.
    And besides, if Jared Bernstein’s graphs mean anything, they might mean that there are some limits to what egging on demand might do. But this gets murky for me. It’s not just “demand” at some rational level we need. It’s another bubbly frothy frivolous carnival we’re going to have to create. Or we have to lower living standards and pick at trash heaps for reusable stuff.
    ******
    Baseline Scenario’s Kwak has a great piece up called “Not all businessmen are smart”! Fun look at some column by someone detailing meeting some businessman or other on a plane. The businessman is carping about regulatory uncertainty and won’t hire because of it. And Kwak’s response is really good.
    There are some interesting underlying issues here. First, of course, the future is always uncertain, so in a sort of Zeno’s paradox way, a businessman can never hire any more than one can ever move from one place to another. It’s the logic of space and time gets in the way of things.
    Second, a commenter at Kwak’s blog notes that maybe the businessman isn’t thinking so much about regulation or capital gains tax rates, but more about enforcement. Maybe said businessman has been cheating and worries about being caught.
    Third, said businessman would seem to be fairly resentful of the existence of other people who mess up his perfectly arranged world. Social resentment runs deep. And control freaks are, well, control freaks.
    It’s hard out there to be a businessman.

    Reply

  4. erichwwk says:

    Related to how “official” news (eg statements by Hillary Clinton) differ from what others see.
    ‘US dropped cluster bombs on Misratah’
    “World – A Human rights investigation in Libya has found that it was the US and its Western allies who cluster bombed the troubled city of Misratah back in April.
    The HRI said it has convincing evidence that the cluster bombing blamed on pro-Gaddafi forces was actually carried out by the US navy.
    The report says at the time of the attack, Human Rights Watch and a reporter working for US media immediately blamed forces loyal to Libya’s embattled leader Muammar Gaddafi for the cluster bombing that threatened civilian lives.
    According to the report, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay and the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were quick to condemn the act.
    Clinton called the cluster bombing of urban areas an act that posed a lot of challenges to both NATO and the opposition.
    International aid agencies and human rights groups had warned of a growing humanitarian disaster in Misratah, Libya’s third largest city.
    “We never saw these injuries before. We need experts to assess [the munitions],” said a doctor at a Misratah hospital back in mid-April.
    The Libyan regime had flatly denied reports that they have used internationally banned cluster bombs in the ongoing clashes with revolutionaries.
    NATO has been bombing Libya since March. Under a UN mandate, the alliance must protect civilians caught up in the battle between the opponents of Gaddafi and his loyalists.
    However, many civilians and even anti-Gaddafi forces have been killed since the Western-led war on Libya began in March. Cluster bombs used by coalition forces in Afghanistan and Iraq have also resulted in civilian casualties.
    Critics, however, accuse the West of hypocrisy over the offensive on Libya, along with its silence towards the brutal crackdowns on similar anti-regime movements elsewhere in the Arab world, such as in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and Yemen.
    Experts say the main motive behind the Western attack on Libya is the vast oil reserves in the North African country.”
    http://en.humanrights-iran.ir/news-17916.aspx
    From Karl Rove as quoted by Ron Suskind and Bob Woodward :
    “The aide [ Karl Rove] said that guys like me were “in what we call the reality-based community,” which he defined as people who “believe that solutions emerge from your judicious study of discernible reality.” … “That’s not the way the world really works anymore,” he continued. “We’re an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you’re studying that reality

    Reply

  5. questions says:

    Rats, wrong about Weiner. Oh well. Darn. It was a good story, at any rate. hmmmm.

    Reply

  6. ... says:

    goodnewsweek – you forgot to mention 22 unarmed protesters gunned down by israel…. this is the us congresses beloved country that can do no wrong, even when they are behaving like nazi’s shooting unarmed palestianians…

    Reply

  7. questions says:

    And speaking of the most vulnerable among us — two takes:
    “Scott Walker, the governor of Wisconsin, and his wife, Tonette Walker, earlier this year had a specially commissioned painting removed from the Governor’s mansion. The painting, an incredibly lifelike scene of three Milwaukee children playing together, was one of many works commissioned by the Executive Residence Foundation, which runs the mansion.”

    [from the artist]:
    “In an interview, Lenz said he carefully selected the three children portrayed in “Wishes in the Wind.” The African-American girl, featured in a Journal Sentinel column on homelessness, spent three months at the Milwaukee Rescue Mission with her mother. The Hispanic girl is a member of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee. And the boy’s father and brother were killed by a drunken driver in 2009. ”
    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/06/06/982503/-Scott-Walker-Removes-Painting-of-Milwaukee-Children-from-Governors-Mansion-
    ******
    From New Deal Democrat over at bonddad’s blog:
    “Simply put, when there is only 1-2% wage growth per year, any inflationary spike – even a 3% spike due to energy increases – is enough to cause the economy to stall. There can be no long-term, sustained recovery for the large majority of Americans unless there is real, long-term wage growth. Thus, while at one level the current slowdown or stall is the result of an energy price shock, on another level it was predictable (and predicted by others and me) due to prices faced by consumers rising faster than their disposable incomes.”
    http://bonddad.blogspot.com/2011/06/need-for-wage-improving-demand-side.html
    ***
    We don’t seem to want to see children who have suffered. We don’t seem to want to see that stagnant incomes over the long haul, without concomitant refinancing of debt or asset-appreciation makes for unlivable existence.
    But apparently we like us some billionaires, whose major policy prescriptions are to vacuum money ever further up the food chain and to make ever so sure that moral hazard rules.
    For some, it would seem, life is meant to be a punishment rather than a joy. There’s a really weird subtext in all of this that we should spend some time on.
    If you add up all the denial of services and refusals to invest in institutions that help people, and you toss in the right wing anti-abortion obsession, and you toss in the issues with schools and assistance for the young and old, the infirm and the unemployed, you end up with a sense that what really motivates a bunch of people is some sense that if you’re not “blessed” with fabulous riches, you really should suffer everything the world can throw at you.
    The “underserving” actually are “deserving” in this seeming subtext — they are deserving of their suffering.
    Read John Kasich, Paul Ryan, Rand Paul, Scott Walker, Rick Scott, Rick Snyder (they practically all have the same name…) in this light.
    And then watch how the whole Republican Party plays along with the cruelty/deserving of a hard fate storyline. Think about how this story line works in magical ways/as talismanic to protect those on the bubble who fear falling.
    If we can identify those whose hard fate is proof of their desert, then the rest of us are protected from that hard fate by our moral superiority. That we haven’t quite fallen is proof of desert.
    It’s all pretty depressing how many symbolic and real actions are being carried out in the name of a fundamental insecurity over the status of one’s soul and one’s place in the cosmos and one’s place in society.

    Reply

  8. questions says:

    If we’re to be judged based on how we treat the most vulnerable of us….
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/06/nyregion/boys-death-highlights-crisis-in-homes-for-disabled.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&hp
    Four or more easy steps to better care for the most vulnerable –
    1. Remember that Hobbes had it figured out that one of the funniest things we can encounter is the suffering of another (falls, odd behavior, think slapstick comedy) for it indicates the good condition of ourselves in contrast. People in institutions will always be vulnerable to ill-treatment just because of this fact of humanity.
    2. Remember that long hours at work, huge amounts of stress, and careless management will strip away any frontal lobe impulse control. Stressed people do dumb stuff. Stressed organizations lead to stressed workers who do dumb stuff. And given that there is a natural dumb quality that can easily emerge, we ought to be more careful with work conditions in institutions.
    3. Remember that anyone you know could either give birth to or father a disabled child, could fall into disability through a stroke or accident, or could know and love a disabled person through the unhappy accident of 1 or 2 above. What you deny in care to others may well come back and slap you in the face.
    4. Increase the salary of the workers, increase their status, increase supervision, decrease hours worked, increase emotional support for those who work with disabled people. Disability is scary, and those who work with disabled people need some support for what they deal with in a day. A raging 250 pound autistic older teen who has never really been communicative would be a challenge for anyone. So make sure that the challenge is met with support for the workers as well as for the patient/client.
    We have developed a very mean society in all sorts of ways. We are mean with money, with emotion, with help. We endlessly feel threatened, and we worry about loss rather than about care. The meaner we are with our resources for others, the worse off any one of us will be when a car accident or a stroke or a fall or a fallen branch in a storm or a tangle with a mean dog or a strong-arm robber takes from us some useful portion or other of a once-working brain. The meaner we are towards one another, the more likely it is that our very own autistic or bi-polar offspring will suffer at the hands of poor care.
    Is there anyone at all anymore who doesn’t know a stroke victim? Someone with autism? Someone who needed physical rehab?
    We probably could do better, and we should.

    Reply

  9. DakotabornKansan says:

    Down the Memory Hole
    Redoubling the Stupid by Digby on Palin Doubling Down on Paul Revere History Lesson
    http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/2011/06/redoubling-stupid-palins-teachable.html

    Reply

  10. questions says:

    Twists and, ahem, turns, in the Weinergate saga!
    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/06/05/982416/-The-Photo-Is-Upside-Down-%28NSFW%29?via=siderec
    And if it’s really Breitbart/Thomas related as some have speculated, maybe it actually is news.
    And if it really involves hacking/pranking an MC’s account, it’s still kind of newsworthy. Not at the Fukushima level, but then, lots of news isn’t at the Fukushima level. But that doesn’t mean all we do is worry about Fukushima 24/7.

    Reply

  11. GoodNewsWeek says:

    So the al-Khalifa family goons are still at it in Bahrain, with Saudi family backup goons holding the fort just in case the population want to vote or women want to drive.
    The US 5th fleet is safely tucked away to protect democracy — ooopps, I mean the loving plutocratic unrepresentative monarchical dictatorships, and all’s right with the world. Business as usual.
    Meanwhile, the evil and ugly Syrian regime gets reported on daily, and a single rape in Libya is still front page news (distraction) whenever necessary. On page 3 Israel is shooting the odd Palestinian border fence protester wanting to get their homeland back.
    NATO are ramping up the propaganda to justify a full-scale invasion of rebel forces with their strategic beaten-up civilian utilities to boot Gaddafi all the way to Moscow.
    US drones are assassinating a few dozen each night in the Afghan wild-lands and Hillary darling has declared nobody (of consequence) knew anything about bin Laden’s 5-year holiday house in the Pakistan establishment’s military relaxation complex.
    Greece is broke (as are Ireland, Portugal, Spain and a dozen other no-tax regions), the Germans are being poisoned by their own e-coli and blaming Spain. Russia is taking the opportunity to protect their own markets (and no doubt Putin is getting ready for the top job round-II).
    Oh, and Japan’s nuclear mess is festering away nicely with only a lonely POA ringing the warning bell — and the TWN moves to the Atlantic.
    Can’t wait for tomorrow … yawn!

    Reply

  12. David Billington says:

    Best wishes in your new editorial position! I hope they allow you to write an
    occasional long-form article.

    Reply

  13. IndigoE says:

    Steve,
    When I first came across TWN its refreshing lack of a clear
    “agenda” caught my attention and I came back daily. The
    comments never failed to amuse me even when they got
    contentious; not that they are earth-shatteringly brilliant, but
    because the conversation is what interests me. How will readers
    respond the “that”, I wonder.
    I paint landscapes for a living. This view into another sphere has
    enriched my world. Here’s hoping you and the blog carry on
    successfully at the Atlantic.

    Reply

  14. DonS says:

    So, in his way, Kristof is about as establishment as it gets — though one may argue he is the red-headed step child — and yet he raises important questions, and points fingers. Perhaps he is the exception to the rule.
    So what is it about a Glen Greenwald, or a Marcy Wheeler or a Jane Hampsher that have tremendous insight and intelligence, yet are reviled by the establishment? Perhaps, put “in charge”, they could redirect could do no worse at piloting the ship of state than the political hacks we have now.
    Personally, I’m not optimistic that the US will gain/regain it’s bearings in my lifetime. Listening to Bob Gates these days — his parting shots as SecDef — sounds like a plea for perpetual military confrontation and domination — much like the heyday of the Roman Empire.

    Reply

  15. DakotabornKansan says:

    Talk of being cynical

    Reply

  16. DonS says:

    I think there’s a blockbuster series in the making that aims to expose the dangerous fealty of the US Congress to Israel, particularly it’s right wing forces.
    “Public” approval, to the extent it exists, is misleading at best. “The public opinion” is shaped by what it is fed, and we pretty much know how puerile that is, and how the questions are asked. Exposing the con game for what it is means out smarting the powerful interests at their own game. Look at Seymour Hersh; a respectable authority, and he gets regularly trashed.

    Reply

  17. DakotabornKansan says:

    What I care most about is reading articles that are engaging and thought provoking. The Atlantic has done this for me over the years.
    Recalling what the political satirist Finley Peter Dunne once said about the most valuable role of journalism being that of comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comfortable, is harder to afflict the comfortable after one has had dinner with them?
    How do those salons benefit us, the consumers of news and opinion? How much of Atlantic

    Reply

  18. Paul Norheim says:

    “I’m cynical. But the only true indicator will be in the future, when we see how Steve handles his new position,
    and what we find when we click on TWN after it joins the Atlantic’s “family” of blogs.”
    Precisely.

    Reply

  19. Robert Traver says:

    Congratulations, Steve. Your work has been fun and
    educational to follow. Thank you.

    Reply

  20. ... says:

    thanks for that info paul norheim… it’s a good reminder of steves situation…

    Reply

  21. ... says:

    hey steve – congrats on your new job… it seems to me you are being accepted by the mainstream establishment with this one… i am not sure just what it means for you, but i wish you the best in it all… it may or may not be a good thing in terms of furthering your particular agenda in all of this, which at this point i am not sure what it is!

    Reply

  22. Paul Norheim says:

    Back in 2007 Steve said this, among other things, regarding what he writes about and don’t write
    about, and why (to commenters who had accused him of not writing about certain issues because
    he was controlled by a certain lobby):
    “…there are a few things that set me off. One of them is the insinuation that anyone controls me –
    particularly on Israel/Palestine issues. The entire reason I ventured into this issue — which I did not
    need to — was to break the cartelized, contained discussion in Washington, and I think that this
    blog and New America have been responsible and constructive “broadeners” of that debate.
    I’m friends with both John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt. I wrote about them before — I see
    Mearsheimer very often and have appeared on numerous panels and programs with him. The
    reasons that I haven’t written more about their book is that — quite frankly — I’m busy. The blog is
    a hobby, one that is an add-on to the work I already do, and I either write things on here that I
    think I personally find interesting — or work on issues that I think demand serious attention.
    Walt/Mearsheimer raise important issues — but there is nothing new in the book that was not part
    of the article. Whether or not we will bomb Iran is far more consequential — and the work I need to
    do to be a responsible commentator and steward here of that subject is very demanding at the
    moment.
    That’s the bottom line — and add to it family responsibilities, an insane travel schedule, and a job -
    - and that is why I haven’t written yet again about Walt/Mearsheimer. When I referred to lemings,
    it’s in the sense that sometimes people want all of the blogs talking about the same things. I just
    don’t do that….or try not to.
    (…) Those who ascribe some secret pressures one way or another on why I write or don’t about
    Israel/Palestine matters simply tick me off.
    I’ve lived through too many real world situations that Walt, Mearsheimer, and frankly — my friend
    Michael Lind — have written about and survived and triumphed over those pressures to accept
    back-biting from critics that I’m controlled or maneuvered by any lobby. That’s absolutely untrue.”

    Reply

  23. DakotabornKansan says:

    The corrupting effect of David Bradley

    Reply

  24. JohnH says:

    We stopped our subscription to The Atlantic. The magazine is typically a cultured version of Jack Kemp, Ann Coulter and Newt Gingrich. Too often they seem to publish “radical thinking” for the sake of radical thinking, which typically turns out to be a advocacy for some ill conceived agenda.
    And then there’s the presence of Jeffrey Goldberg, a neo-crazy posing claiming to be a liberal, the perfect illustration of what’s wrong with the magazine.
    The magazine has had an interesting stable of bloggers, some of whom have left. I always enjoyed reading James Fallows, who curiously enough, always seem to stop his analysis short of the obvious conclusions, perhaps fearing to cross the bounds of Washington conventional wisdom. Fallows seemed to have great insights and would have been more interesting if he felt free to put in print what he really knew.

    Reply

  25. DakotabornKansan says:

    Lowly, rank stenographers to the powerful versus journalism
    Glenn Greenwald on Politico

    Reply

  26. questions says:

    If you haven’t been following the kos Weiner-Wars, you should! New Media plus tech savvy plus Anonymiss (!!) is really something.
    We’ll see how this all comes out in the wash, if it does.
    If nothing else, it’s kind of fun to follow, and I personally had never heard of “yfrog” and I hardly get Twitter, when you get down to it….
    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/06/04/982122/-Breaking:-Christian-Infowar-Militia-Attacked-Congressman-Weiner?via=siderec
    Anything Breitbart touches……
    If Steve can do anything at Atlantic and dot com, it might be nice to give space to some “new journalism” with far more tech savvy and far more local, on the ground watching than we often get. Newsrooms are strapped financially, are strapped to bottomline thinking rather than to truthifying. There are a lot of energetic people with dayjobs who are happy to spend their evenings using their techabilities to investigate crotch shots allegedly of an MC, and possibly actually of a porn star…. (One of the guys seemingly involved is in the industry…..)
    It’s all murky still, but seems to be far more involved than anything the WaPo/NYT axis of objectivity would seem able to find.
    There is room for wedding new tech to solid reporting to generate high quality, informative, entertaining, and truthifying content.
    Go for it!

    Reply

  27. Warren Metzler says:

    POA, I’m perplexed as to your comments regarding Steve. He starts a blog. He uses it to present material he is interested in, predominately oriented to foreign affairs. He allows all comments that are presented in a civil manner. And he does, over time, give each reader a very broad cross section of the current status quo thinking on many issues; kind of a behind the scene “here is what is taking place, regarding this issue”. He has developed a world wide reputation, so that lots of shakers and bakers of the world read this blog, giving you, and every other commentator who posts on his blog, an opportunity to have lots of prominent people around the world read your opinion. Where is the UN agreement, national reporters’ association’s, bloggers of America association’s, etc., rules of engagement that Steve signed that provides a POA approved list of world hot spots or hot topics that tell Steve what he must post?
    If you want to have a blog that creates posts that met your relevance criteria, why not start your own blog and see how quickly you can gain the large number of readers that read The Washington Note?
    I read blogs to tell me what other people in the world think about issues. And from time to time I put in my two cents. I don’t assume that any blog has a responsibility to post discussions on any one topic I prefer. I am crystal clear that each person in the world only operates from a world view that arises from that person’s view of his or her experiences. No one ever operates simply because of what others say. Each person is influenced (not affected, forced to act) by what certain others present, but only after that person has taken what others present and passes it through a “how does that match what I experience” process. This is why sugar always catches more flies than vinegar.

    Reply

  28. Warren Metzler says:

    POA, I’m preplexed as to your comments regarding Steve. He starts a blog. He uses it to present material he is interested in, predominately oriented to foreign affairs. He allows all comments that are presented in a civil manner. And he does, over time, give each reader a very broad cross section of the current status quo thinking on many issues; kind of a behind the scene “here is what is taking place, regarding this issue”. He has developed a world wide reputation, so that lots of shakers and bakers of the world read this blog, giving you, and every other commentator who posts on his blog, an opportunity to have lots of prominent people around the world read your opinion. Where is the UN agreement, national reporters’ association’s, bloggers of America association’s, etc., rules of engagement that Steve signed that provides a POA approved list of world hot spots or hot topics that tell Steve what he must post?
    If you want to have a blog that creates posts that met your relevance criteria, why not start your own blog and see how quickly you can gain the large number of readers that read The Washington Note?
    I read blogs to tell me what other people in the world think about issues. And from time to time I put in my two cents. I don’t assume that any blog has a responsibility to post discussions on any one topic I prefer. I am crystal clear that each person in the world only operates from a world view that arises from that person’s view of his or her experiences. No one ever operates simply because of what others say. Each person is influenced (not affected, forced to act) by what certain others present, but only after that person has taken what others present and passes itthrough a “how does that match what I experience” process. This is why sugar always catches more flies than vinegar.

    Reply

  29. bob h says:

    Beltway conventional wisdom is that jobs are the only thing that matters until the election of 2012. But I look at the world and see a treacherous, dangerous place that has to be navigated with some skill, as Obama and Clinton are doing. Foreign policy cannot be sidelined.
    So I would like to see more focus on the question whether, in this still-dangerous, fluidly shifting world, we hand over foreign management to provincial, All-American exceptionalists with any confidence.

    Reply

  30. DakotabornKansan says:

    Reading about David Bradley

    Reply

  31. Dan Kervick says:

    I have always thought of the Atlantic as the voice of the American establishment. Sometimes the establishment is right; sometimes it’s wrong. But that’s who the Atlantic is, and that’s pretty much why I don’t like to read it.
    The fact that corporations can buy audiences with establishment opinion-leaders at the Atlantic to tell them what to think on issues of corporate concern is not surprising.

    Reply

  32. DakotabornKansan says:

    There are two Atlantic articles (all accepting public comments) that I remember citing:
    The Quiet Coup by Simon Johnson/May 2009 and How the New Jobless Era Will Transform America by Don Peck/March 2010 I am sure there are more.
    I remember faithfully reading The Atlantic Monthly in the Carnegie Library as a young boy in South Dakota. I still do.
    When the National Magazine Awards (known as the Ellies) 2011 finalists were announced in April, The Atlantic received four nominations in the following categories:
    Public Interest (honors magazine journalism that illuminates issues of local or national importance); Feature Writing (honors magazines for original, stylish storytelling);
    Profile Writing (honors news or feature stories focused on individuals or groups of closely linked individuals); and Fiction (honors the best short stories published in magazines); as well as being nominated for Magazine of the Year (honors publications that have achieved excellence both in print and on digital platforms.) Although the Atlantic did not win any of the awards, it is still quite an achievement.
    The first issue of The Atlantic Monthly appeared in November of 1857. The magazine’s founders included Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., John Greenleaf Whittier and James Russell Lowell.
    In 1999 Atlantic Monthly was purchased by David Bradley, whose focus was on improving its editorial quality by hiring 25 new writers, including James Fallows, one of the magazine’s best-known journalists, who had been hired away in 1996. Bradley has a reputation for going to great lengths to lure writers to The Atlantic. To lure Jeffrey Goldberg away from The New Yorker, Bradley brought ponies to Goldberg’s house to show Goldberg’s three young children.
    [It is interesting that Steve is arriving just as Goldberg is leaving. What a contrast between those two, what with Steve helping to organize the letter to Obama urging him not to veto the UN Security Council resolution opposing Israeli settlements.]
    According to Howard Kurtz,

    Reply

  33. Orwell says:

    22 years have passed. Pray for Peace and souls who dedicated themselves.
    http://youtu.be/jR4M8zeep6c

    Reply

  34. non-hater says:

    Congratulations, Steve.

    Reply

  35. Paul Norheim says:

    “My understanding is that the blogs at the Atlantic don’t allow comments.”
    ————
    “That’s news to me. I just took a look at the blog roll at the Atlantic site and they all appear to
    have comments”
    ———————————————-
    While Andrew Sullivan was at the Atlantic, his Daily Dish didn’t allow comments, and it still
    doesn’t where he is now, at The Daily Beast/Newsweek site. He gets lots of email, and quotes
    some of the comments from his inbox as anonymous “readers”. Apparently the rest of the
    bloggers at The Atlantic allow comments.

    Reply

  36. Cato the Censor says:

    Congratulations on your new job. Does this mean you can fire Megan McArdle? Let the libertarian see how much she digs being jobless.

    Reply

  37. Dan Kervick says:

    “My understanding is that the blogs at the Atlantic don’t allow comments.”
    That’s news to me. I just took a look at the blog roll at the Atlantic site and they all appear to have comments:
    http://www.theatlantic.com/marc-ambinder/

    Reply

  38. WigWag says:

    Congratulations, Steve. Everyone who has followed the Washington Note over the years feels a real sense of pride for what you have accomplished. Having your old pal James Fallows as a neighbor in cyberspace should be great fun, but I can’t believe that you haven’t even moved into your new job yet and you’ve already fired Jeffrey Goldberg (who announced that his blog is moving to Tablet).
    Political blogs move around so often these days its hard to keep up- Andrew Sullivan leaves the Atlantic and moves to the Daily Beast; Laura Rozen moves so often its hard to know where she will land next; Goldberg moves to Bloomberg and Tablet and the Washington Note gets new digs as well.
    My understanding is that the blogs at the Atlantic don’t allow comments so it should be quite a culture shock for some of your most devoted fans.
    I am sure you will do a brilliant job. I look forward to reading the Washington Note in its new venue.
    Congratulations again.

    Reply

  39. Dan Kervick says:

    Well, there will finally be an Atlantic blog I want to read. I read Matt Yglesias’s blog when he was part of the Atlantic family, but none of the others. And when Matt left the Atlantic that was it for me.

    Reply

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *